Tag Archives: Travel

Detroit: Just A Taste

31 Jan

drinkin' 002 (1)

Detroit has always been a city of makers; today’s subject is booze. Alcohol was big business in Detroit; in 1850 Stroh’s produced an annual capacity of 500,000 barrels of beer.  The largest distiller was Hiram Walker, (yes he was an American and a Detroiter) he started out as a grocer distilling cider vinegar in 1830, he moved on to whiskey 1854. During prohibition Detroit became a bootleggers paradise, the Detroit River is less than a mile across in some places making Canada a short trip by boat, sled or automobile. It’s estimated that the Detroit River, Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair River carried 75% of the liquor supplied to the US during Prohibition. Bootlegging, smuggling, rum-running, whatever you want to call it, was Detroit’s second largest industry in 1929. 

drinkin' 051 (1)

drinkin' 049 (1)

drinkin' 004 (1)drinkin' 007 (1)

Two James Spirits has the unique distinction of being the first licensed distillery to open in Michigan since Prohibition. Today we’re doing a tour, grab yourself a drink and c’mon along. Founders David Landrum and Peter Bailey opened the distillery and tasting room in 2013. The name comes from the coincidence that both of their fathers are named James. The building is an oldie, a Dodge/Chrysler dealer in the ’20’s, an auto repair facility & cab company later in life. We have about 30 minutes to kill before the tour  starts, just long enough to enjoy a Nutty Irishman. Andreas places the cocktail on the bar, a layer of half and half floats above the dark brown spirits, I combine the layers, stirring gently with my straw; I love the way it looks as the cream swirls in the glass. Kris and I chat as we watch lemons and limes being sliced, egg whites dropped into shakers and cherries being skewered; all for your drinking pleasure.

drinkin' 009 (1)

drinkin' 030 (1)

drinkin' 013 (1)

Our glass is empty, time for the tour. We cross from the tasting room to the distillery, the temperature drops noticeably. My attention immediately goes to the 500 gallon custom-made copper pot still,  it’s a real showstopper. We’re surrounded by heavy-duty shelving stacked with American Oak barrels, stacks of cardboard cases on pallets, tanks, hoses and pipes.  Up first, 28 Island Vodka. The name references the 28 islands in the Detroit River that served as a safe-haven for Detroit’s clandestine distillers during Prohibition. The Barrel Reserve Old Cockney Gin lets the gin rest in new American Oak for a minimum of 6 months before being bottled.  How about a little rum? Doctor Bird Jamaica Rum  is actually made in the Caribbean then blended and aged in a special moscatel barrique in Detroit.

drinkin' 042 (1)

drinkin' 023 (1)drinkin' 038 (1)

drinkin' 029 (1)

Whiskey anyone? Try Grass Widow Bourbon, Rye Dog, Catcher’s Rye or Johnny Smoking Gun. The newest spirit in the arsenal is J Riddle Peated Bourbon. Look at the label for a minute, see that cute little ‘red fox’? Hhmm, J Riddle, could that be James Riddle Hoffa who disappeared from the Machus Red Fox in Bloomfield Hills? I’m not tellin’. The Nain Rouge Absinthe Verte starts with the traditional 19th Century French recipe and then gets Two-Jamesd. It has great depth of flavor and a pretty green color, I’m a fan of licorice so I really like it. We scope out the production area learning about the distilling process, different grains used and the bottling process. Up a few stairs we have an up-close view of the mash tub, the yellow-ish goop inside bubbles and pops, we even get to taste it. Pipes lead to fermentation tanks, finishing tanks and the gravity bottling machine; It’s all very technical. 

drinkin' 081 (1)

drinkin' 060 (1)

drinkin' 054 (1)drinkin' 066 (1)drinkin' 080 (1)

In 1993 Joe Mifsud purchased the building that now houses Two James and his recently opened restaurant Cork and Gabel. We’ve admired this building for years and are really excited to finally go inside. Joe has a deep affection for these old Detroit buildings, he likes to re-use what’s there in addition to adding other Detroit found objects–like the giant oil drum used for the entryway to the restaurant. What a super-cool way to enter a building, I like the graffiti. I’d describe the interior as rustic industrial, there are old pulleys and other things left from the building’s automotive days, there’s an old bell, even the light fixtures were rescued from an old structure. Chairs are mis-matched, tables are made of old bowling lanes, can you find the Easy Bake Oven? An eclectic blend of old and new giving the place a modern, cozy feeling.We sit at the bar only to learn the kitchen doesn’t open for another half hour, so we order a cocktail… The menu is a fusion of Italian, German and Irish offerings, everything sounds good. When the time comes ours is the first order to reach the kitchen. We start with the Caprese Salad which can be a no-no in January, the tomatoes are ripe and tasty, nice slices of mozzarella drizzled with balsamic vinegar, set upon pesto; well done and a nice surprise in January. The Schnitzel BLT is huge! A crispy, well seasoned, breaded slice of pork loin sits atop Ma’s rye bread (made in house, it’s fabulous!), slices of crispy thick-cut applewood smoked bacon, bibb lettuce, tomato, the other slice of bread is finished with boursin cheese. Yum!

drinkin' 094 (1)

drinkin' 086 (1)

drinkin' 085 (1)

Have you ever heard of Brew Detroit? They have a 68,000 sq. ft. facility in Corktown. In addition to brewing their own beer they are a contract brewery, making beer for Stroh’s, Motor City Brewing Works, Bad Ass Beer, Lake Brothers Beer Co and others. Guess what? They do tours too! We pay for the tour and choose our ‘walking beer’, this is the one we get to take on the tour; Kris chooses a stout made with Germack coffee, I’m drinking the East Sea Baltic Porter, it’s delicious. The production area is home to eleven 400-barrel and two 200-barrel fermentation tanks, they’re gigantic. Our guide talks about tanks, vessels, grain, fermentation, temperature-controlled yeast propagation, spectrometer, alcolyzer and all kinds of other things I’ve never heard of while Kris and I just look around and think, WoW! The place is huge, the tanks are enormous, there’s just so much BEER! We have journeyed from the brewhouse to the canning and bottling line or as they say, from “hops to glass”.

drinkin' 088 (1)

drinkin' 091 (1)

drinkin' 093 (1)

drinkin' 099 (1)

The tour ends in the merchandise area where we are given souvenir Brew Detroit pint glasses and wooden tokens good for a beer in the tasting room. Taking a seat at the rectangular bar we enjoy a beer while checking out the selection of 30 rotating draft taps of beer, wine, cider and meads. There are pinball and air hockey machines, arcade games, shuffleboard, darts, billiards and foosball spread out over two floors. This place is definitely worth seeking out for a beer, tour or just to hang out with friends.

drinkin' 108 (1)

drinkin' 126 (1)

drinkin' 114 (1)

It’s dark and it’s cold but we can’t leave Corktown until we check out Winterfest at Michigan Central Station. Ford has put together a celebration of the to-be-restored 1913 train station that includes a 3D light show, fire pits to keep warm and roast marshmallows for S’mores, food trucks and an exhibition of “found” objects from the building. We park on the street and make the trek to the building, a crowd of parka-wearing, scarf and mitten laden pedestrians have gathered around heaters and fire pits to watch colorful images flashed upon the 18-story building. Magically the building comes to life, the past and future splashed across the surface, a train thunders by. It’s graffiti covered, draped in newspaper then covered in blocks of colors, windows appear to light up, a hand draws the Ford logo; it’s a constantly changing canvas of amazement. As much as I’d like to stay, my face is frozen and I can’t feel my toes; it’s been fun.

drinkin' 121 (1)

drinkin' 112 (1)

drinkin' 118 (1)

Port Huron: Hangin’ on to Christmas..

12 Jan

port huron 039 (1)

Every town has its hidden gems, unique places and distinct personality. Today we are in Port Huron to sample the old, the new and a little holiday tradition. The city is undergoing a much welcomed revitalization; frankly I wonder what took so long? An array of restaurants and shops in a picturesque Victorian-era downtown, situated on an international border, sandy beaches, panoramic Lake Huron views, all about an hours drive from Detroit.

the Kitchen 009 (1)

the Kitchen 005 (1)

the Kitchen 003 (1)

The old Michigan National Bank building on the southeast corner of the Black River and Military Street is in the process of becoming a City Flats Hotel. If you’ve ever been to their locations in Grand Rapids or Holland, you know how exciting this is. The 36-room hotel, ballroom, bar and restaurants are slated to open in May 2019. One of the restaurants, the Kitchen, is open for business; let’s grab a bite to eat. We park in the lot behind the building and enter from the rear, here we stop to admire a rendering of the Ballroom, samples of materials and dinnerware build anticipation of the space. A quick right and we’re in the cafe. Because it’s a casual space you order at the counter. I’m a little distracted by the house made scones and bagels on display, maybe 10 varieties of each (try the bacon, cheddar, jalapeno bagel–you’re welcome). Then there’s the coffee menu serving Grand Rapids-based MADCAP coffee. Ok, ok, let’s have the soup and this month’s special ‘bowl’. I fill our water glasses and join Kris at a table, one wall of the cafe is glass, a balcony overlooks the Black River and offers more dining space in nice weather. We watch the goings-on outside until our food arrives. The Tuscan White Bean soup is excellent; rich flavors, nicely seasoned. Our power bowl is a bed of quinoa topped with hard-boiled egg, avocado, diced red pepper, shredded carrots and sunflower seeds. The vegetables are fresh, the quinoa cooked perfectly, maybe tossed with a vinegar-type dressing, delicious. 

port huron 002 (1)

port huron 025 (1)

port huron 026 (2)

From one of the newest business in town we drive to one of the oldest, the Brass Rail Bar on Huron Ave. Steeped in holiday tradition, this place is a must visit during the Christmas season.There’s parking available on the street in front of the bar, that’s a good sign; this time of year the bar can be packed. I love the old signage on the building, I always wondered about the Beer-Wine Takeout sign… Evergreen roping and ornaments decorate the awning, stained glass windows are aglow. Stepping inside transports us back in time, Christmas lights and decorations cling to every surface. We grab two seats at the bar and begin to take it all in. The centerpiece of the space is the spectacular back bar, made of mahogany and onyx with a Tiffany lamp built into the center, it measures in at a ginormous 13’2″ tall by 16’8″ wide; it’s been here from the beginning when this was Hibye’s Ice Cream parlor. The story goes this way; Tony Hibye purchased it in 1910 from a local drugstore that had purchased it from a local hotel who had it shipped from Italy. Tony, his wife and daughter Helen built a thriving business selling ice cream, candy and fruit; the depression hit, Tony passed away. Helen took over the reigns with the help of her mother and aunt, they went from selling “sweets to suds”; the Brass Rail was born in 1937. Remember the takeout sign I mentioned? Helen obtained a unique liquor license allowing the bar to sell beer and wine when the bar itself isn’t open, you can still come in and buy a 6-pack of beer to go.

port huron 013 (1)

port huron 033 (2)

port huron 016 (1)

They say while Helen was at a bar in Detroit she had a Tom and Jerry, from then on the Brass Rail made the traditional drink from Thanksgiving weekend through New Year’s Eve, which is why we’re here today. Sitting patiently at the bar waiting to order I take in the sights and sounds that surround me; friends greet one another with handshakes and hugs, patrons are jolly, some don Christmas sweaters, one man wears a string of lights. A wide ledge above the antique wood paneling is the footing for new and vintage animated figures, snowmen, carolers, Angels, bears, toy soldiers and Christmas trees. Ceiling fixtures are surrounded by lighted wreaths,Tom and Jerry’s fill server’s trays. Audible is the constant humming sound of Kitchen Aid mixers whipping up egg whites and egg yolks separately before they are joined with a little powdered sugar, hot water, rum and brandy. It’s finally my turn, a cute little teddy bear adorns my mug, a short red straw and a green stirrer emerge from the frothy mixture that rises from the mug. I look around the room for a clue as how to properly drink a Tom and Jerry, it seems everyone has their own method so I go for it. I take a sip right from the mug, a smile creeps across my face, the frothy top combines with the warm liquid below; it’s a wonderful, slightly sweet, creamy combination of heat, booze and a little nutmeg, in other words, heaven.

port huron 062 (2)

port huron 090

port huron 053 (1)

port huron 108

North of downtown, nestled along the Lake Huron shoreline is an Historic neighborhood called Sherman Woods. The first house went up in 1926, today 63 households make up the district. We like walking here any time of year; streets meander past mature trees, over gentle hills, giving homeowners views of the great lake. Each house is completely different from the next, built in different styles throughout different time periods. The neighborhood enjoys 700 feet of private beachfront, a sidewalk allows visitors like us a glimpse of the beautiful lakefront homes. This time of year is even more special, residents go all out with their decorations. The most common decoration, a theme you might say, is a ball made of chicken wire, drenched in lights and strung from high branches in towering trees. It’s hard to describe the sensation, bubbles everywhere, like you’re floating in a glass of Christmas champagne… We take our time walking from street to street, other couples, families, even dogs seem to be delighted by what we see. Darkness has fully arrived and with it a steady stream of cars taking in the splendor. That’s our cue it’s time to go.

port huron 052 (1)

port huron 101 (1)

port huron 117

port huron 104

Kris takes the scenic way back, always on the roads that cling to the water. Christmas lights pierce the darkness, each little town has gotten in on the act. We cruise through a light display at a water-side park, oh good, that house near Junction Buoy did the blue lights on the tree. Even the Canadian refineries look like they’re decked out for the holiday. It’s been an amazing evening. Go grab your calendar, turn to December and make yourself a little note; Port Huron, Tom & Jerry, Lights. You’ll have as much fun as we did!

port huron 135 (1)

port huron 142 (1)

port huron 145

Ann Arbor: A Manor Christmas

19 Dec

Concordia 074 (1)

Earhart Manor rests on the grounds of Concordia University in Ann Arbor. Today the manor is open to the public for a Christmas tour of the home and grounds; all proceeds provide the Concordia Guild scholarship support for the university students. Once a 400-acre dairy farm, the property known then as The Meadows was purchased by Harry B Earhart and his wife Carrie in 1916. H.B. Earhart was the agent for the White Star Refining Company based in Buffalo NY. He purchased the failing company in 1911, moved its headquarters to Michigan and watched the business flourish as the auto industry boomed. He turned the company into a major enterprise that included a chain of gas stations and a refinery in Oklahoma. He eventually sold the business to Socony-Vacuum Oil Co. which later became Mobil; something tells me he did all right. At first the family used the Meadows as a get-away, they moved there from Detroit in 1920. When H.B. retired at the age of 66 he decided to build the home of his dreams on the property, the manor was completed in 1935.

Concordia 090 (1)

Concordia 075 (1)

Concordia 007 (1)

The limestone home was designed by Detroit architectural firm Smith, Hinchman and Grylls, the exterior is elegantly detailed with a slate roof, copper eaves and stone detailing; they even hand-chisled the limestone to simulate age. Festive garlands with bright red bows adorn the front entrance. Inside we are greeted by volunteers giving details about the home. I expected the interior to be large open spaces but instead find charming, intimate rooms. The foyer is light filled and bright, decorations stream from the ceiling and walls, a built-in cabinet holds an antique record player surrounded by vintage record albums from Bing Crosby, Kate Smith and others. Albums could be stacked for continuous play, what a cool contraption. Each room in the house has been decorated by a different interior designer; I love looking at all the beautiful decorations. Traffic flow is at a stand-still so we take the stairs to the 3rd floor, stopping along the way to admire the Art Deco handrail, newel and balusters. We arrive at the Ballroom, the barrel ceiling with a skylight is pretty awesome; gold and silver stars dangle from the ceiling. The decorating theme is Nativities, I’ve never seen so many different ones. This is where the Earhart’s would entertain; there’s a stage at one end where a band would perform or the grandchildren would put on plays. A movie projection booth is on the opposite side, since there was no sound system they played family home movies on the screen instead of Hollywood films. 

Concordia 011 (1)

Concordia 012 (3)Concordia 022 (1)

Concordia 019 (2)

The second floor is where the family slept. When they moved into the house 3 of their 4 children had already gone off to college, Elizabeth was already in high school; no need for lots of bedrooms. Today the bedrooms are used for offices and conference rooms and are not open for the tour. Descending the staircase gives us a nice view of the main floor, people have dispersed into other areas making it easy for us to move around. At one end of the hall is the Dining Room, it’s gorgeous. Decked out in cream and turquoise, a pretty chandelier, ornate fireplace and lovely architectural details make the room opulent. A pencil tree wears colored decorations to match the room, Christmas figurines stand in recessed shelves. In their later years Mr and Mrs Earhart took their meals at the small table in the breakfast nook. I’ve decided this is my favorite room.

Concordia 029 (1)

Concordia 032 (1)Concordia 030 (1)

Concordia 031 (1)

The Library is next, wood paneling, full bookcases and deep colors give the room a definite masculine feel. Poinsettia-filled urns flank the fireplace, evergreen roping is draped throughout the space. Two Christmas trees are decorated with white lights, silk flowers and wide ribbon. On one side a bookcase has been slid open revealing a ‘secret’ staircase, let’s see where it goes. Concrete steps and brick walls lead us to the basement Billiard Room, sweet! As you would expect the room is decorated perfectly for Christmas; lots of live greens, baskets of fruit, nuts and pine cones. Candles flicker in the fireplace, antique light fixtures give the room a warm glow. This is where H.B. would hang out with his friends.

Concordia 037 (1)

Concordia 040 (1)

Concordia 051 (1)

Back up in the main hall we poke our heads into the study, we see another secret passage in the wall. The Living Room is the largest room in the house; surrounded by rich wood paneling with a large fireplace it’s actually quite cozy. A grand piano sits at the far end, the Earhart’s were fond of music, a Christmas tree is set up in front of the bay window, I bet that’s the way the family did it too. When the house was built they incorporated the latest technology for the time; air conditioning, showers with ten heads, vented closets with lights that went on when you opened the door. They say Mrs Earhart was never more than 10 feet away from a call button to summon servants.

Concordia 059 (2)

Concordia 064 (1)

Concordia 071

We exit through the glass doors onto the patio, a gorgeous Pewabic tile fountain is built into the wall. The grounds are pretty expansive; there used to be a Peony-lined walk, Rose garden and lily pond. We walk past the gazebo and grape arbor to the greenhouse, this was here long before they built the manor house. You can tell it’s really old by the glass panes and mechanisms used to open and close the windows. One section has Christmas trees for sale, you can also purchase Poinsettia plants, flowering cactus, Cyclamen, ornaments and hand-made cards. Decorated trees are on display in the other half of the greenhouse, they were part of an auction held earlier in the week and are waiting to be picked up.

Concordia 092 (1)

Concordia 093 (1)Concordia 097 (1)

Concordia 095 (2)

Carrie passed away in 1940, H.B. stayed in the house, they say the greenhouse was one of his favorite places to sit and be with friends. I also learned that H.B. was the primary creator of the Huron-Clinton Metro Authority. H.B. passed away in 1954 at the age of 83. A portion of the Earhart Estate including the manor was sold to the Lutheran Church in 1961 for the establishment of Concordia University. The private university offers majors in four academic schools: Nursing, Arts & Sciences, Business, Education. The school restored the manor and continues to care for it and the grounds.

Concordia 107 (1)

Concordia 104 (1)

Time to eat! Zingerman’s Roadhouse on Jackson rd has been here for 15 years now. It’s the 7th member of Zingerman’s community of businesses in Ann Arbor. While places like the deli celebrate good food from all over the world, the Roadhouse focuses on really good American food with old-time classics like mac and cheese, fried chicken, corn dogs and Carolina bbq. It’s super-busy when we arrive but the wait is short. I’m so hungry I can’t decide what to get, Kris is in a breakfast mood, an omelette it is. The other good thing about breakfast items is they don’t take long to cook. The omelette is fluffy and filled with tasty items like cheese, bacon and spinach, the homemade biscuit is surrounded by little cups of creamed honey, jam and butter. French fries and cheesy grits complete the meal. That was good! Be sure and check out the nifty collection of antique salt and pepper shakers displayed throughout the restaurant. Before we hit the road I stop at the Roadshow, a vintage Spartan trailer attached to the Roadhouse that offers the convenience of a drive-thru or a walk-up window for carry-out or coffee, I’m here for the coffee. It’s been a really good day.

Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a New Year filled with fun adventures!

Detroit: The Train Station

4 Dec

michigan central 185 (1)

Finally…. For years Kris has avoided taking photos of Michigan Central station. It wasn’t that he didn’t love the building, the architecture, the history; he has fond memories of this place. The family vacation to Colorado in ’72, the Freedom Train in ’76, remembering the beautiful castle-like space from his childhood. But it had become the symbol of the death of the city, the ruin porn capitol, an iconic image of Detroit’s decline. Time after time we’d pass by watching the cars with Illinois, Ohio, Ontario license plates snapping photos and selfies out front, propagating the image of Detroit as the graveyard of skyscrapers… Kris, ever the contrarian, was having no part of the cliche’. Today all of that changes, today we’re going inside and for all the right reasons; the station will live again!!

michigan central 003 (1)

michigan central 007 (1)

michigan central 009 (1)

It’s Friday evening Kris and I have the unique opportunity to see a film inside Michigan Central Station (aka the old train station) in Detroit. Ford, History and the Freep Film Fest are hosting a special screening of Detroit: Comeback City inside the building that inspired the film.  The film explores the rise, fall and epic re-birth through a single building; Michigan Central Station. Detroit, once one of America’s richest city’s is now America’s comeback city. After the film we have about 45 minutes for a self-guided tour. I’ve never set foot in the building, I’m so excited!

michigan central 098 (1)

michigan central 183 (1)

michigan central 074 (1)

The temperature tonight is below average–it’s downright cold, an email suggests we bring blankets so I do. Standing in front of the building I am awestruck by the sheer size and grandeur; it’s beautiful. I have never been this close before, walking with my head tipped back I have to be mindful of where I’m stepping, Kris competes with other tourists taking photos. We pass through that grand arch, a smile plastered to my face, we sign waivers and are given packages of hand warmers, I only half-pay attention, the building and the exotic lighting are captivating. Rows of folding chairs are set up in front of a large screen, we sit in the back, there’s no escaping the frigid breeze that blows through giant window openings; I’m glad I brought a blanket. As I wait for the film to start I gaze at my surroundings, all of the rubble from years of decay and vandalism have been removed, a net clings to the ceiling in case a random brick comes loose, architectural details are highlighted by cool LED lighting. The film begins. Sit back and enjoy Kris’s photos while I tell you about MCS.

michigan central 164 (1)

michigan central 100 (1)

michigan central 180 (1)

Michigan Central Station opened in 1913. It was put into service before it was finished; the old train station caught fire, trains were rushed over to the new station where they came and went until 1988. Designed in the Beaux Arts Classical style it was the tallest train station in the world at that time. The main waiting room stretches the length of the building, it was modeled after the public baths of ancient Rome with walls of marble, vaulted ceilings, bronze chandeliers and massive Doric columns. A large hall called an arcade housed a cigar shop, newsstand, pharmacy, barber shop, telephone booths, baths and an info booth. Brick walls and a copper skylight surrounded the concourse, a restaurant was at the far end. Detroit was a thriving city, an industrial powerhouse; this is where it greeted its visitors and new residents.  I’ve looked at a ton of vintage photos; the massive main waiting room, broad coffered arches, the reading room with potted palms, leather chairs and wood-beamed ceiling, white table cloths in the restaurant, light streaming through the grand Palladian window. It made a statement about the city; when you stepped into MCS you knew you were someplace great.

michigan central 043 (1)

michigan central 061 (1)

michigan central 056 (1)

michigan central 150 (1)

Soldiers heading off to forts, boot camps, WWI, WWII, Korea and Vietnam left from these tracks.   At the beginning of WWI more than 200 trains left the station daily, in the 1940’s more than 4,000 passengers a day passed through its doors. Whatever was going on in the city or the world the activity centered around MCS. Think about it, at one time the majority of autombiles came from Detroit, trains delivered them across the country. When the factories needed workers, trains brought a huge influx of men from the south. Presidents, movie stars, industrialists arrived in the Motor City by train. We were the Arsenal of Democracy, the capital of innovation, the Silicone Valley of the early 20th Century; from the Model T to music there was a feeling there wasn’t anything Detroit couldn’t do. And then it changed. Here we are today; after decades of decline the city not only survived bankruptcy, it’s thriving. It’s only fitting that MCS, which has become a major symbol for the city through both good and bad times will be restored to its original glory.  Ford Motor Company plans to move 2,500 employees into the building which will be Ford’s research campus for autonomous vehicle development and deployment. The main floor will be public space with shops and cafes.

michigan central 069 (1)

michigan central 068 (1)

michigan central 156 (1)michigan central 153 (1)

With my blanket wrapped around my shoulders I follow Kris’s lead through the main floor of the building, I feel minuscule in the space. Historic photos explain what we are seeing, for the most part each area is still defined; the arcade with its inset spaces, the ticket windows, the restaurant. Much of the detail remains, surprising considering rain, snow, explorers and vandals have trespassed the building for 3 decades. The roof over the concourse has been removed, yesterdays rain lays in puddles on the floor, the brick walls are intact.  Volunteers are positioned throughout to answer questions, I enjoy listening to people telling their stories about the building; coming to see the Freedom Train, the trips they took or coming to pick up a relative, there are great emotional ties to the building. I stand off to the side to take it all in, just seeing the people here tonight it’s easy to imagine excited travelers arriving and departing. When it was announced that Ford purchased the building an anonymous caller told them where they could find the iconic clock that he had been ‘safekeeping’, there have been more than 2 dozen calls offering the return of a historic fountain, a plaster medallion and light fixtures, no questions asked. It’s a weird thing, somehow we Detroiters feel like the building belongs to all of us.

michigan central 089 (1)

michigan central 093 (1)michigan central 082 (2)

michigan central 024 (1)

We’re having dinner at Rocco’s Italian Deli in the Cass Corridor. The red-brick building has a parking lot on the side, very convenient. The interior is one big open space in white with concrete floors, open ceiling, retro lighting and table or counter seating. A pantry area features dry pasta, canned tomatoes, vinegar, oils and crackers. Refrigerated cases are filled with cured meats, cheeses and olives, the chalkboard menu is filled with delicious sounding sandwiches and salads. We sit at the counter and place our order, I’m having a glass of the house red wine to help warm me up. The chicken noodle soup is set in front of me, there’s nothing like a good bowl of soup! Kris digs into the Chop Chop Salad; cubes of cucumber, tomato, beet, garbanzo’s and carrot tossed in house balsamic, the veggies have a nice crunch, it’s delicious. The Breast Chicken Parm sandwich is a fried chicken cutlet topped with tasty marinara, mozzarella and grated parm on the perfect Italian bread, it’s so good. Easy parking, fast and friendly service and excellent food, a nice addition to the city.

michigan central 201 (2)

michigan central 197 (1)

michigan central 191 (1)

Willis Show Bar opened on the corner of Willis and Third in 1949. The facade of the building is burgundy and pink with a great curved entrance. It opened in the glitzy show bar era of live entertainment and Jazz, it was a Detroit hot-spot. Same old story; neighborhood declined, bar turned seedy, padlocked in 1978. Investors from California partnered with the Detroit Optimist Society to breathe new life into the old building. Upon our arrival we are greeted by the official doorman, the entryway is a wood-paneled circular space with a terrazzo floor, a big “W” sits in the middle. The waiting area is closed off from the main space by a thick velvet curtain, we pay our $7 cover charge, get handed glasses of champagne and are led into the bar. I love it.

michigan central 228 (1)

michigan central 210 (1)

michigan central 208 (2)

The only thing left of the original interior was the curved Art Moderne ceiling which has been completely restored, the new bar follows the same curves as the ceiling, the elevated main stage rests snugly behind the bar. One long banquette runs nearly the length of the bar with tables pulled up in front, a second level of booths sit against the back wall; every seat faces the stage. The band starts their set and suddenly it’s 1949 again; the decor, the music, the craft cocktails, the burlesque dancer. Waiters wear matching suits, service is top-notch, no detail has been left out.  Wills Show Bar is reborn.

michigan central 207 (1)

michigan central 223 (1)

michigan central 217 (1)

When the city of Detroit burned to the ground in 1805 Father Gabriel Richard said: Speramus meliora; resurgent cineribus. We hope for better things, it shall arise from the ashes. It seems that is the story of Detroit, a testament to the resilience of Detroiters. We rise, we fall and we get back up again. 

Indiana Dunes

18 Nov

west 276 (1)

 We’re heading south to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore for the Century Of Progress Home Tour. We get an early start, surrounded by the blue of the lake and the cloudless sky we’re following the shoreline down; the lake is on the right, stunning beach homes on the left.  Our tour leaves from the Indiana Dunes Visitor Center at 11:20. After checking in we have a little time to check out the Century of Progress Historic District display. Here’s a little background on what we’re going to see. In 1927 Frederick Bartlett purchased 3,600 acres of land along the Lake Michigan shoreline for a planned resort community, the land was plotted into thousands of home sites. The Great Depression brought the development to a halt, many of the plots were never built on. In 1933 Frederick’s brother Robert purchased the development, he named it after his daughter, Beverly Shores was born. Robert had a brilliant idea, the extremely successful Chicago 1933-34 Century of Progress World’s Fair had come to an end. Why not purchase some of the demonstration homes and move them to Beverly Shores? He did. He bought 16 buildings in all, four of the houses on the tour were moved by barge across Lake Michigan to the spot they still sit today; the fifth home was brought by truck. Surely the notoriety would bring publicity to the area and the development.

west 279 (1)

west 186 (1)

west 200 (1)

west 195 (1)

Our tour guide works for the National Park Service, as we drive he explains that with the creation of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in 1966, the National Park service began acquiring land and buildings including the Century of Progress homes. Indiana Landmarks has leased all of the houses from the NPS, subleasing them to private individuals who restore them using their own funds, we’re talking millions. We make a left, soon the lake comes into view, a right turn and the bus parks. All 25 of us disembark, the Armco-Ferro House sits on a bluff to our right, the Chicago skyline can be seen clearly across Lake Michigan. The house was originally all metal; walls, floors and the roof were corrugated steel panels, the exterior panels were porcelain-enameled. In 1933 the house was touted as having a maintenance-free exterior; over time the elements took their toll, the roof leaked, water got in everywhere, there was rust and deterioration, not to mention the house was basically set on a sand dune. Fortunately for all of us, the perfect people leased the house, they had it raised and a new foundation installed. The house has been restored with a mix of old and new materials; exterior panels are now stainless steel, windows are restored originals, it looks awesome! Inside, period furniture fills the rooms, the view from the front windows is exceptional, magazine articles from 1933 are framed and on display. I love the little Art Deco touches. 

west 263 (1)

west 202 (1)

west 207 (1)

We walk next door to the House of Tomorrow, this one is under restoration by Indiana Landmarks along with the National Trust. The $2.5 million project will recapture the 1934 appearance. Standing outside, it reminds me of a giant wedding cake; you wouldn’t know it by looking at it today but the second and third stories of this 3-story, steel framed house were clad in glass–talk about solar energy! The main floor contained the workshop, mechanical room, garage and of course what every 20th century family needed, an airplane hangar. At the World’s Fair people were drawn to its innovative structure, prefabricated and modern materials; Modernism had arrived. Sandwich boards display photos and information about the building, it was pretty amazing for its time. The interior is a maze of studs, work lights, flaking paint and rust. A circular stairway leads us to the second and third floors. Parts of the original kitchen remain, the Elgin nameplate still clings to the steel cabinets. Light leaks in from open spaces caused by missing floor boards, be careful where you step. I find it fascinating to think people actually lived here more than 80 years ago. There’s a story that says when the house was on display in Chicago it got so hot inside during the summer months the docent had to stand outside…

west 210 (1)

west 212 (1)west 217 (1)

west 224 (1)

The theme of the 1933-34 World’s Fair was technological innovation, American Rolling Mill Company and the Ferro Enamel Corporation sponsored the first house, the House of Tomorrow was designed and sponsored by Chicago architect George Fred Kreck, he set out to change the direction of residential architecture. The next house was sponsored by the Southern Cypress Manufacturers Association. They hired Chicago architect Murray D Hetherington to design a structure to promote cypress as a building material, which brings us to the Cypress Log House and Guest House. As we stand in line waiting to go in Kris and I admire the building, it has all the charm of a mountain lodge; stone chimney, gorgeous dark wood exterior, cedar shingles, window boxes, green-painted window frames, it even has bird houses built into the design. I wish you could see the inside, it looks straight out of a magazine with Martha Stewart as the decorator. Lots of wood, floor to ceiling windows overlooking the lake, a huge stone fireplace; I want to sit down and have a cup of coffee in one of the comfy-looking chairs. This is the house that was moved to Beverly Shores by truck. It’s lovely.

west 250 (2)

west 243 (1)

west 238 (1)

west 259 (1)

Now remember, this was 1933, the Great Depression still gripped the nation. My father-in-law lived in Chicago at the time, I love to imagine him as the 10-year-old boy that he was, riding his bike around the fair. Visitors got a glimpse of the latest wonders in rail travel, automobiles and architecture. The Houses of Tomorrow exhibit allowed people to dream of a better time with new, modern home conveniences, exciting designs and new building materials. The Wieboldt-Rostone House designed by Walter Scholer blended Art Deco and Art Moderne elements to showcase the use of steel and masonry for a modern family home. The Indiana Bridge Company provided the structural system, including wall framing and corrugated steel roof panels. Unfortunately for this house the exterior was clad in an experimental synthetic stone (Rostone) composed of shale and limestone waste. It failed in 1950 and had to be replaced with Perma-Stone. In the 1980’s the Perma-Stone began to fail, the lake levels rose causing problems with the septic field, the roof leaked, damaging the interior. The exterior has been completely restored right down to the landscaping; the original Rostone still surrounds the front door and entry hall. The bathroom managed to survive and in a word its fabulous! The house is right on the beach so the view is amazing. 

west 300 (1)

west 301 (1)

west 287 (1)

west 293 (1)

For us the Florida Tropical House was the true gem of the tour. First of all, who can resist a Flamingo-pink-colored house? Second, who wouldn’t want to live on Lake Michigan? Third, who doesn’t love Art Deco? The state of Florida sponsored this house to entice people to come to Florida for a tropical getaway. At that time Florida was in the early stages of becoming a ‘vacation paradise’. From the moment we step in the door I’m speechless, I walk along tapping Kris’s arm and pointing at things; the hand-painted Art Deco murals, the soaring windows, the aluminum hand rails and stairs, decorative door knobs and hinges; truly glamorous in an old-Hollywood kind-of-way. The furniture is all period-perfect, the colors tropical, the overhangs and roof decks, wow–the only thing missing is a Palm tree. The house is magnificent. The owner has completely restored the building including installing 192 foundation piers to level it and provide a firm footing. I wish we could show you the interiors but photos are not permitted. Time to load the bus and head back to the Visitors Center.

west 282 (1)

west 273 (1)

west 260 (1)

Before heading back we take a drive through Indiana Dunes State Park. We park and take a walk on one of the beaches, funny we’ve never really explored this part of Lake Michigan before. Old Art Deco buildings stand in sandy parking lots, trees and shrubs grip the dunes, Chicago skyscrapers loom in the distance. We leave the park driving on a two-lane road through forest and wetlands on our way to Michigan City  ,we don’t pass another vehicle. We’ve run out of snacks and bottled water, time to get some real food.

west 312 (1)

west 318 (1)

west 323 (1)

west 321 (1)

We were out this way last May and found a great little microbrewery in the Elston Grove Historic District, that’s where we’re having lunch. Zorn Brew Works originally opened in 1871 when Bavarian immigrant Phillip Zorn migrated to Michigan City IN to start his own brewery; unfortunately it closed in 1938. 77 years later Michigan City’s oldest microbrewery became its newest as Zorn Brew Works was reborn at 9th and York streets. It’s a great old brick building with tons of charm and character from its brass chandeliers to the cool old beer posters and memorabilia. The beer is great, I had the Elston Grove Oatmeal Stout, Kris had the Carriage House double IPA. The food is delicious; I could just drink the beer and eat the pretzel bites dipped in beer cheese but then I would miss out on the excellent sandwiches, we had the Zorn, yum! It’s a great place to stop in and just chill out, especially after a busy day like we’ve had.

west 349 (1)west 345 (1)

west 332 (1)west 336 (2)

west 340 (1)

Back up the coast we go, if you really look you can find tiny roads that let you ride along the water, the houses along the shore are pretty amazing too! One of our favorite places to drive though in the area is Beachwalk, a resort development of cottages and beach homes that looks like a box of crayola crayons. Let’s take a drive through. The streets wind past lavender, turquoise, lime, yellow, coral and blue cottages. All are surrounded by a white picket fence, sand and dune grass replaces traditional lawns. Homes range from one to three stories, balconies, decks and porches are trimmed out in crisp white. We have been driving through here for years, the development started with 7 homes, today there are nearly 200.  Many of the cottages have been closed up for the season, shades are pulled, grills are covered, fallen leaves gather on porch steps. 

west 389 (1)

west 374 (1)

west 363 (2)

west 369 (1)

west 367 (1)

Driving north along the lake we pass through charming beach communities in Michiana, Grand Beach and New Buffalo, I highly recommend the drive. Not only is Lake Michigan gorgeous but the array of houses perched on the bluff is fantastic. You’ll see everything from a traditional brick ranch to an old stucco beauty from the 1920’s, there are Tudors, orange tile roofs, contemporary homes and mid-century moderns. The one feature they all share is large windows; who can resist that view?

St Joseph

5 Nov

west 172 (2)

From the tip of the Mitten to the cuff, there is no shortage of charming little towns along the Lake Michigan shoreline. Today we’re about 190 miles west of Detroit in the city of St. Joseph.  It’s locale, about 90 miles northeast of Chicago, made it a huge tourist destination complete with miles of sandy beachfront and an amusement park back in the day. This lovely port town sits on a bluff overlooking the lake, a pair of lighthouses flank the St Joseph River; inland some of the country’s finest orchards and vineyards cover the rolling countryside. This is the largest non-citrus fruit-growing region in the nation. Every summer tourists swarm the city; they swim in the cool blue water, shop in unique boutiques, eat ice cream and fudge and watch spectacular sunsets. At this time of year the bulk of tourists have gone home, there are no lines, we share tree-lined streets with locals and parking is easy.

west 093 (1)

west 002 (1)

west 012 (1)

west 010 (1)

The first order of business is lunch; we prefer someplace with a scenic view, Schu’s on Pleasant Street is perfect. The restaurant has an old-school, resort town feel; lots of wood, a stone fireplace, an upside down boat dangles from the ceiling, and of course, it has a view of the water. Service is speedy and friendly, before we know it we’re enjoying a delicious burger cooked perfectly medium with a pile of crispy fries. When we’re finished I grab my umbrella out of the Jeep and we take a stroll through town. Rain has begun, we duck into Cafe Tosi to grab a coffee, the caramel bomb looks too good to resist, I meet Kris at the table with our drinks, a sweet treat and two forks. The sunny yellow interior is opposite of the dreary scene out the window. The place is buzzing with activity, everybody seems to know each other, I like that. When I think of St Joseph one of the first things that comes to mind is the elegant Maids Of The Mist Fountain. Cherubs join two female statues nicknamed Constance and Hope sitting beneath the largest of three basins as water cascades into the pool below; I really love these old fountains. Built in 1872 by JW Fiske Ironworks of NYC, the owner of the Whitcomb Hotel purchased it out of Chicago and moved it to Lake Bluff Park in 1892, it has become a city landmark.

west 017 (1)west 016 (1)

west 022 (1)

west 031 (1)west 036 (1)

By the time we’re finished the rain has stopped; time to explore. Many of the storefronts look unchanged, flowerpots are filled with colorful blooms, water bowls offer furry friends a little refreshment. In and out of shops we go, Michigan-themed shirts, hats, bags and drinkware are found in Lazy Daisy. There’s a cool consignment shop called Re Imagine filled with do-dads, art and craft supplies, fun gifts, repurposed items, jams and honey. The whimsical cows of the ‘cow parade’ make me smile. A couple of shops offer wine tastings from local vineyards, South Bend Chocolate Company has all kinds of chocolate treats, cakes and cheesecakes. No Michigan tourist town is legit without a Kilwins, I can smell the fudge from the sidewalk; this one is doing a brisk business today. We find the antique shops in town have a nice selection of Mid Century Modern pieces. In addition to furniture and accessories this one has a fantastic collection of cameras tucked snugly into wooden cubbies. The only brand names I recognize are Polaroid and Kodak. They have some great movie cameras too along with vintage advertisements.

west 039 (1)west 047 (1)

west 071 (1)

west 081 (1)west 085

Black Rose Jewelry’s storefront is gorgeous; black vitrolite and unique showcase windows that you only find in a jewelry store. I wonder if this has always been a jewelry store. I imagine many businesses have come and gone through the decades. Perennial Accents is a good example, now a kitchen-goods store filled with gadgets, small appliances, linens, colanders and graters, a brass plaque on the floor tells us this was originally Gillespies Drugstore in 1866. Schaller Gallery housed in an attractive brick building sells fabulous handmade pottery. White walls and simple tables and shelves allow the pottery to get all the attention. Teapots, dishes, mugs are all beautiful, you can eat off of art. Our favorite building is an old bank that houses Wanderlust, an outdoor apparel and gear store. We go inside to see if any of the old architecture remains, we’re delighted to find thick moldings, columns and original ceiling details. The coolest part is the safes, they’re gorgeous! Look at the hinges, gears, decorative patterns everywhere, they use some of them for dressing rooms–makes me want to try something on.

west 080 (1)

west 077 (1)

west 038 (1)

west 062 (1)west 059 (1)

 In 1891 the Silver Beach Amusement Park opened on the land between the lake and the mouth of the St Joseph River, think Coney Island in NY; rides, concessions, games of chance, bumper cars and a boardwalk; they added a roller coaster in 1904 called Chase Through The Clouds. In 1910 a carousel was brought in; 44 hand-carved, life-like horses; it was hugely popular.The carousel operated continuously until 1971 when the amusement park closed. Today thanks to the dedication and fundraising ability of the Silver Beach Carousel Society a replica carousel has been placed at Silver Beach Center, an entertainment center below the bluff just yards from Lake Michigan’s Silver Beach. We park in the center’s lot, the building is part museum, part activity center. Inside large black and white photos and memorabilia  give us a peek at Silver Beach in its heyday; crowds of people on the beach, a rollercoaster, rides and several buildings including Shadowland Ballroom which opened in 1927; a caption reads “This place was so cool”.  People came by car and train to this amazing summer play land. Next we check out the carousel, in operation since 2010, it was built by Carousel works in Mansfield OH. There are only a few riders this afternoon. We watch as bejeweled horses rise and fall to old-fashioned music, there’s a serpent and a peacock chariot for those who prefer an even ride. Rounding boards around the top depict historical themes of southwest Michigan; computer graphics artists created the boards using a montage of colorized, historic photos. Around the carousel we find vintage cars from rides, penny arcade machines and a gypsy who will tell us our fortune for pocket change.

west 116 (1)

west 096 (1)

west 103 (1)west 102 (1)

We only have 1 day in St Joseph so we’re trying to do as much as possible. This area of Michigan is largely agricultural, grapes are plentiful, which means so is wine. The northern route of the Makers Trail runs through Stevensville, St. Joseph, Benton Harbor, Coloma and Watervliet. Let’s start with Karma Vista Vineyard and Winery. The view of the vineyard and farm from the tasting room is outstanding. Light rain continues to fall across the landscape, it feels good to be inside. I head straight to the counter to do a tasting, Kris looks around a little taking photos out the large windows, you can see the tractor marks in the freshly mowed lawn, vines are dense with leaves and heavy with dark clusters of grapes. With Kris’s help I taste about 6 different wines, I’m impresses with their Cabernet; I like all of them, seriously. I choose a few bottles to take home and we’re off to the next winery.

west 137 (1)

west 131 (1)west 134 (1)

west 128 (1)

Vineyard 2121 is on Red Arrow Highway, it’s pretty popular on this late Friday afternoon. Wooden steps lead us from the gravel parking lot to the red-sided tasting room. There’s live music on the far side, there are 2 open seats at the circular bar. A group of girlfriends have gathered for a bite of food and glasses of wine. I order a glass of white wine and sip on it while checking out the merchandise; they have many varieties of wine along with t-shirts, glasses, all the usual things one finds at a winery. As we drive to the next place we pass rows and rows of grapevines, they are loaded with fruit, part of me just wants to stop and pick a grape and eat it straight from the vine. It’s harvest season, someone told us that on a nice day an enticing grape scent fills the air–like smelling grape juice. Speaking of grape juice, this is where a lot of the grapes are grown for Welch’s Grape juice.

west 153 (1)

west 142 (1)

west 151 (1)

12 Corners Vineyards is my favorite winery of the day. The cozy interior has a knotty pine ceiling, large wooden beams and a stunning view of the vineyard. It’s a big place; there are a couple of bars for tasting, cafe tables for drinking and rack after rack of Estate and Ice Wine, oh and Big Daddy Hard Cider too. I check out the tasting menu, it’s a long list. People around us are super-friendly and share tips on their favorites. We tried a little of everything; red, white and fruit wines. When we were finished and making our decision on what to purchase they served us each a piece of chocolate from Vineyards Chocolate, wine and chocolate? It doesn’t get better than this! 

west 166 (1)

west 155 (1)

west 158 (1)

Ypsilanti: Calling All Cars

16 Oct

Orphan 164 (1)

Once upon a time in the United States over a thousand automobile manufacturers existed; storied names like Packard, Imperial, Hudson, Desoto and Oldsmobile rolled off the assembly lines in Detroit. Slowly they faded away taking factories and manufacturing jobs with them. We’re all familiar with GM, Ford and Chrysler and their recently departed subsidiaries; Pontiac, Mercury, Oldsmobile, Plymouth. In the early 1900’s there were many other big names; Studebaker, Duesenberg, Nash, Hudson, Maxwell, Stutz, on and on… Some of these were bought up by the Big Three, others were phased out over time. Today we’re celebrating their memory at the Ypsilanti Automotive Heritage Museum‘s 22nd Annual Orphan Car Show, a tribute to vehicles from manufacturers that no longer exist. The featured brand is Plymouth, introduced in 1928, production was discontinued in 2001 making it 90 years old today. Plymouth was Chrysler’s entry into the low-priced market, during the Great Depression Plymouth significantly helped Chrysler survive through a decade when many other car companies failed. Let’s check them out, what do you like? The Art Deco ’39 has square headlights, daring for its time, the “Mayflower” hood ornament is way cool. The Sport Fury convertible is a beauty, love the copper interior. Maybe you’re into muscle cars, Superbird, GTX, or Duster anyone?

Orphan 102 (1)

Orphan 103 (1)

Orphan 108 (1)

Orphan 110 (1)

When we arrive at Riverside Park, beautiful automobiles are parked as far as the eye can see. Throughout the day vehicles will do a Pass In Review; one brand at a time cars drive the park loop, each pausing in front of grandstands, the master of ceremonies speaks about the car and does a short interview with the owner, it’s really interesting to hear the stories of how long they’ve had the car or where they found it, some significant detail, that kind of stuff; Kaiser-Frazer’s are being reviewed when we arrive. Vehicles are parked in groups by brand, the first one we see is Imperial, it was originally a brand of its own till the late 60’s. Let me tell you, the coral-colored ’57 is stunning; look at the fancy lettering, the “I” of Imperial has to be nearly 6″ tall, little crown emblems are here and there, look at the rocket-ship-style taillights. The white convertible with the red interior is gorgeous; Imperials have always been one of Kris’s favorite brands. The late-model DeSoto’s are pretty sweet too, love the 2-tone paint jobs where the roof is a different color. I stand on the side looking down the row of cars, this is the finned era, massive chrome bumpers flank the front and back, space-age-like taillights, decorative chrome molding is everywhere — in those days, beauty trumped cost. Steering wheels are stylish and dashboards are dazzling, like you’re driving a juke box…

Orphan 008 (1)

Orphan 189 (1)

Orphan 014 (1)

Orphan 039 (1)

This cluster of DeSoto’s span a decade, from the pale yellow 1940’s model to the heavily chromed grills of the 50’s, they always remind me of a mouthful of big teeth, the Firedome V8 nameplate is snazzy; how about those wide white walls?  That’s a pretty fancy glass hood ornament on the ’42 model. Zigging and zagging in the afternoon sun we see an electric vehicle, a Mercury Lynx, it’s funny, when you read the nameplates you say, oh yeah, I remember those. The Mercury Cougar convertible looks great in blue, did you know that Canadian Mercury’s were called Monarchs? The Lucerne is pretty luxe, I like the big crown badges. Seems like you could do anything back then.

Orphan 019 (1)

Orphan 024 (1)

Orphan 172 (1)

Orphan 174 (1)

Pontiac, they always seemed so stylish. The green ’53 is gorgeous, I love the mid-century chief medallion, the hood ornament lights up too, seriously. A mid-70’s Grand Am, 1964 GTO, a red Fiero and a gold 1979 Trans Am are also representing. Oldsmobile, the pride of Lansing, a late 50’s Super 88, seemingly wearing as much chrome as paint, is glistening in the sun. The 1965 442 is a great example of Oldsmobile’s contribution to the world of musclecars. I’d bet they caused their fair share of trouble on Woodward avenue back in the day.

Orphan 049 (1)

Orphan 045 (1)

Orphan 063 (1)

Orphan 055 (1)

Orphan 057 (1)

The Packard plant on Grand Boulevard is well known in the Detroit area, for years urban explorers have taken clandestine trips through its hallowed halls. Tours are offered to explore the decaying remains and offer hope for the future. Somewhere along the way I wonder if the resplendent automobiles that rolled down the assembly line have been forgotten in the process.  Always known for their elegance and signature grille, Packard’s have always appealed to me. The ’31 is lovely in beige and tan, how about the Art Deco styling cues of the 1940. I could see myself in the two-tone turquoise 1956 Four-Hundred, the instrument cluster looks like it’s out of an airplane…

Orphan 168 (1)

Orphan 161 (1)

Orphan 146 (1)

Orphan 150 (1)

In 1954 the amalgamation of Nash and Hudson Motors formed the beginnings of American Motors Corporation. At the time it was the largest merger of corporations in US history. Hard to believe that the ultra luxurious early 30’s Nash in front of me is a distant relative to the Gremlin! The burgundy Hudson Hornet looks more like a custom with its chopped fastback roofline; it must have looked really slick when it appeared in 1950. I love the medallion on the Marlin Fastback, so mid-century. I’ve got to admit, I think the Gremlin and Pacer are really cute cars; I get a kick out of the one with the Levi interior.

Orphan 114 (1)

Orphan 125 (1)

Orphan 088 (1)

Orphan 170 (1)

There are so many cars here, so many brands…We pass a group of Corvairs, they were assembled at the Willow Run plant. In the Brass Era we see a 1913 Cole, a 1911 Ann Arbor and an EMF, none of which we’ve ever heard of before.  The 1929 Willy’s Knight is fabulous, it even has a Knight for a hood ornament. There are all kinds of Studebakers; a ’27 Roadster, a President in blue, a Super Hawk and the unusual 1963 Avanti which came with a super-charged engine from the factory. Edsels are distinct, the taillights on the 1960 Ranger unlike any others. Each vehicle is adorned with a million little details, hood ornaments are works of art, trim pieces, door handles, shifters, fabrics, wheels and dashboards are thoughtfully designed. You knew a Plymouth from a Mercury, a Nash from a Hudson. You could get practically any color of the rainbow, inside and out. The good ol’ days.

Orphan 097 (1)

Orphan 185 (1)Orphan 069 (1)

Orphan 140 (1)

Orphan 183 (1)

Ypsi is home to really good restaurants, today we’re eating at Bona Sera on Michigan Ave, they serve creative Italian fare with a southern twist. Two walls of windows allow lots of natural light to fill the space, primary colors are used on the walls and in the decor, potted plants give a sense of warmth, paper lanterns and a tin ceiling add a bit of whimsy. Everything on the brunch menu sounds delicious, we order the waffle served with Calder’s whipped cream and a pile of fresh fruit. we are not disappointed. The biscuits and gravy are fantastic; buttermilk biscuits smothered in sausage gravy and topped with two over-easy eggs, it looks like I licked my bowl clean. 

Orphan 201 (1)

Orphan 199 (1)

Orphan 190 (1)

River St is bustling today, coffee shops, a food co-op and shops have livened up the district. Cultivate Coffee and Tap House serves, as you may have guessed, craft coffee and draft brews, we’re here for the coffee. I read the list of selections while I stand in line, I order two cold brews; Kris has found us seating at a community table towards the back. The space is cozy and attractive and very busy today; I’d say the sales of beer to coffee is about equal. Feeling revived after a nice meal and a coffee it’s time to hit the road.  

Orphan 220 (1)

Orphan 217 (1)

Port Huron: Floating Sculpture

3 Oct

Boat the Blue 203 (1)

The Michigan chapter of the Antique and Classic Boat Society is hosting the 2018 ACBS International Boat Show on the Black River in Port Huron. Participants began arriving earlier in the week; group activities and tours through the St Clair Flats show people around the Blue Water Region, guides tell visitors about the amazing local boating history and legendary men Christopher Smith and Gar Wood. Boaters, collectors and curious people from the United States and Canada are gathered along the length of River Street Marina, nearly 200 boats have made the trek and are on display for the public. We arrive early in the day, fog hangs low, I hope it burns off soon. A stairway leads us down to the river bank, we start at the 10th Street bridge, looking ahead we can see boats double and triple parked all the way to the Erie Street bridge, crowds of people mingle along the sidewalk, excited visitors wearing orange life jackets line up for a free ride on a classic boat.

Boat the Blue 099 (1)

Boat the Blue 044 (1)Boat the Blue 091 (1)

Boat the Blue 046 (1)

We don’t own a classic boat, it’s the beauty, styling and craftsmanship that brings us here today. Chris Craft outnumbers brands such as Lyman, Century, Higgins, Larson, Gar Wood; each one unique and eye-catching. Mahogany, Teak, chrome, red is a popular interior color, signs are on display listing the brand, size, motor and owner’s name. The humidity is high, the fog beginning to lift as we proceed down the river. Some owners go to great lengths with their displays; Lily has her own lily pads, “Rhubarb” is here all the way from Washington State with lots of pretty little rhubarb details, tables are set, picnic baskets are filled with goodies, antique water skis are ready to go. Boat designs reflect the automobiles of the time; steering wheels, big chrome emblems, dashboards filled with gauges, knobs and levers, tinted windshields, chrome exhaust tips. Engine compartments are open, men on docks stand and stare, fiberglass bodies are designed like automotive fins, wide stripes, bright colors, so cool!

Boat the Blue 059 (1)

Boat the Blue 042 (1)

Boat the Blue 075 (1)

Boat the Blue 003 (1)

All shapes and sizes are present; cruisers, runabouts, classic launch and utility. The Higgins is a showstopper in red and white, I love the wrap-around windshield. The two-toned Chris Craft looks sweet with a red interior, I’m liking the wooden boats with the black-painted sides too. Kris’s favorite so far is the 21′ 1961 Chris Craft Continental with a Lincoln 275 hp motor, it’s fabulous in turquoise, gold seat inserts and funky roof supports, it screams 1960’s. A pair of silver boats are tied to a dock, they look like something Batman would drive. I’m surprised how many boats have multiple levels, I can only imagine the view from the top. The woodwork and attention to detail is exceptional, everything was thoughtfully designed, beauty was as important as function. Restoration photos always blow my mind, the time and effort put in can only be described as a labor of love. My favorite photos are the ones of the father and son, brothers, best buddies, arms around each others back, wide grins, standing in front of the finished project.

Boat the Blue 026 (1)

Boat the Blue 063 (1)

Boat the Blue 174 (1)

Boat the Blue 217 (1)

Vendors are set up on the grass, they come from all over to sell boat-centric items from jewelry and clothing to wax and ACBS souvenirs. The most adorable boat wagons I’ve ever seen, ok, the only ones I’ve ever seen, are for sale along with rocking horse boats and wooden boat hats, all very clever. We climb up the stairs pausing on the bridge, here we have a great view of the show, a whole different visual perspective of the boats, a gorgeous sight. Following the Black River we end up at the mouth where it joins the St Clair River, boats are filled with passengers coming and going, all enjoying the deep blue water and now sunny sky. Freighters pass in the distance, a little red boat with polka dot curtains looks minuscule in comparison. The old railroad bridge still reaches straight up, it’s become a bit of an icon, a landmark, I hope they never get rid of it.

Boat the Blue 212 (1)

Boat the Blue 178 (1)

Boat the Blue 198 (1)

Boat the Blue 200 (1)

Walking back through the show we stop at several boats to get a closer look, some of the cruisers are open to the public to come aboard. This time I notice the steering wheel of Wilgold is on the left like a car. I ask around and learn that boat propellers turn clockwise. Hulls used to be designed in such a way that when there was torque on the prop the right side of the boat would rise up. The steering wheel was put on the right so the weight of the driver would counteract that. Modern hulls don’t have that problem but the design stuck. Most racing boats have the steering wheel on the left.  A trailer contains a Lyman display, photos show the old factory in its glory days in Sandusky OH. We actually stopped in that building last summer. It’s now event space but the owners have kept a bit of the Lyman heritage alive with boats and memorabilia.

Boat the Blue 220 (1)

Boat the Blue 188 (1)

Boat the Blue 190 (1)

Boat the Blue 163 (1)

Back at 10th Street we climb the hill towards the parking lot. A group of antique cars are on display for the festivities. Packards, Pierce Arrow, Lincoln, Auburn (a boattail of course) and even a Wills Sainte Clair join the gathering. Ernest Camera Shop has a vehicle here with antique reproduction Kodak advertising on it, looks great. Time to get some food, it has turned into a perfect September day, waterside dining is a must.

Boat the Blue 151 (1)

Boat the Blue 146 (1)

Boat the Blue 145 (1)

Boat the Blue 141 (1)

Courses is located in the Culinary Institute of Michigan, part of the Baker College system. Students get world-class training in baking and pastry, culinary arts, food and beverage management. Students learn the art and business side of the food service industry. The building sits on a grassy hill next to the old Thomas Edison Inn, now the Double Tree Hotel, overlooking the St Clair River, Canada and the Blue Water Bridge–how’s that for scenery? Students are the hosts, servers, bartenders and chefs. A tv above the bar allows you to watch the students at work in the kitchen. There’s an open table right in front of the windows, perfect, we are greeted quickly, given menus and water.  Our server arrives with the signature bread basket, takes our order and heads to the kitchen. We satisfy our hunger with pretzel rolls, cranberry bread, bread sticks and sweet muffins topped with blue cheese. The food arrives and we dig in without hesitation. I’m having today’s pasta which is fettuccine with a vodka sauce topped with roasted vegetables, it’s wonderful. Kris has the German stew, tender chunks of meat in a rich smoky sauce with peppers and onions topped with spaetzle, very good. Courses is open Wed-Fri from 11:30 – 2:00 when classes are in session. Check the website before you come, a reservation is never a bad idea. The food is delicious, prices are fair and the view is unbeatable.

Courses 004 (1)

Courses 011 (1)

Courses 009 (1)

Courses 019 (1)

Metamora

21 Sep

Stables 028 (1)

This year Metamora Hunt is celebrating its 90th year. We’re here for the 10th Annual Hunt Country Stable Tour, a self-guided tour that allows participants an up-close, personal visit to 6 area farms. Metamora Hunt Country is the area from Ray Rd to Sutton Rd and Metamora Rd to Havens Rd; proceeds from the tour go toward maintaining the bridle paths. We start at the Hunt Kennels on Barber Rd where we purchase tickets and pick up our maps; the first stable is just down the road. Red House Farm was established in the 1880’s by the Morse family, the current owner added a horse stable and a smokehouse. As soon as we arrive we see the namesake Red House trimmed in white, porches are adorned with fancy spindles and trim, seasonal wreaths hang on the doors. The in-ground pool behind the house surprises us, it’s so inviting it’s hard not to be tempted to dive in. Perennial gardens are jam-packed with tall grasses, Black-Eyed Susan, butterfly bush and Russian sage; the Cleome are stunning.

Stables 021 (1)

Stables 013 (1)

Stables 020 (1)

Stables 015 (1)

Old Magnolia Farm is just as beautiful as I remember it. 100 acres of riding trails, wooded areas, hay fields and of course the elegant home and stable. The grass is green and lush, the split-rail fence is black, gentle, rolling hills make up the terrain; you’d swear you were in Kentucky horse country. We stop in the tack room with its casual sitting area, cold bottles of water and sugar cookies in the shape of horses set out for guests. Horses appear content in their luxurious surroundings, they don’t seem to mind the extra attention from today’s visitors. We stroll along the covered walkway leading from the stable to the main house, mounds of Hydrangea wrap the corners of the home. Standing in the front yard we pause to take in the sight, there is tons of architectural detail, from the wrought iron on the second level to the more than a dozen arches surrounding the front porch, shrubs are perfectly manicured, flower-studded urns flank the front patio–sigh. Yeah, it’s that beautiful.

Stables 043 (1)

Stables 034 (1)

Stables 025 (1)

Stables 048 (1)

Black Fawn Farm covers 15 acres, the stable and house match in grey with crisp white trim and black shutters. They have a great horse weathervane. Outside I visit with the animals, a donkey shares yard space with horses, he’s doing his best to get his share of attention. There are 5 fenced paddocks, a carriage barn and a horse barn with a pretty southern yellow pine interior.

Stables 071 (1)

Stables 068 (1)

Stables 066 (1)

Stonehedge is home to many of the country’s top Arabian horses, it’s also a prominent breeding facility. The long, rustic-looking stable sits on wooded property, inside, horse stalls wear the name of each tenant; as I pet each one I call them by name. We wander around the barn complex into the arena, we end up in the indoor round pen designed by the owner, definitely unique.

Stables 073 (1)

Stables 074 (1)

Stables 084 (1)

Stonefield Farm is 80 acres of land, the home, designed by architect John Vinci, is built in the style of Frank Lloyd Wright. Horizontal in nature the structure looks as if it’s built into the landscape, there are lots of windows to overlook the property, landscaping is naturalized. It’s s bit of a hike back to the barn built earlier this year. I’m going to make it up and say the barn is built of Pine, whatever kind of wood it is, it’s lovely. We enter through a sliding door and find ourselves in a cozy family room type space. That same beautiful wood makes up the interior, couches look comfy and inviting, there’s even a mini kitchen. The stable area has that same cozy touch; the wood and wrought iron stalls give the barn a very open feel, I could definitely hang out here.

Stables 109 (1)

Stables 105 (1)

Stables 094 (1)

Stables 101 (1)

Stump Lane Farm has been owned by the same family since 1956, the name comes from the grass lane lined with tree stumps set on end, you can find more tree trunk sections embedded into the cement in the old section of the barn. The house is a beauty in white with black shutters, flowers spill from window boxes. We walk over to see the horses, the white fellow catches a glimpse of us and trots over for a visit. Before we leave we cross the road and watch the herd of cows in the pasture. The little ones seem as curious about us as we are about them.

Stables 112 (1)

Stables 126 (1)Stables 118 (1)

Stables 111 (1)

Let’s eat! White Horse Inn re-opened in November of 2014 after a complete restoration, with its equestrian theme and homage to the days of fox-hunting and stagecoaches it’s the only proper place to eat today. As much as I love the interior, the weather is patio-perfect. Striped umbrellas hover over wrought iron tables and chairs, the exterior of the beautiful stone fireplace and weathered cedar adds a lovely touch. We start with the Orchard Salad; mixed greens, blue cheese, diced apple, candied walnuts and dried cherries splashed with maple vinaigrette. I love the different textures and the balance of sweet and tart. There’s a grilled cheese sandwich on special today; thick bread grilled with a blend of cheeses, sautéed onions and jalapeno peppers, the bread has a nice crunch and the filling oozes out with every bite, yum! The waffle fries are excellent.

MMora 024 (1)

MMora 001 (1)MMora 006 (1)

After much anticipation Metamora General has opened right across the street. Brought to you by the same folks who own White Horse, the store is a blend of neighborhood coffee shop, convenience store, boutique and wine shop–you really have to see it to get it. It is no surprise the shop is beautiful; from the relaxing patio area with casual seating and fall decor to the interior with its opulent chandeliers, cafe tables, grey subway tile and the handmade wood floor. The shop is still in its infancy, you can get an espresso and drink it in the quaint surroundings, pick up a bottle of wine and a gift your party host, find a scarf or new handbag or grab one of Max’s donuts and a fountain drink for the road. Eventually there will be more food items and wine by the glass so stay tuned.

MMora 018 (1)

MMora 010 (1)

MMora 013 (1)

MMora 014 (1)

One more stop… Red Barn ~ Metamora is this great home accessory, found objects, antiques, furniture, gift shop located inside of, you guessed it, a big red barn. Outside Kris checks out the old tractor, I head inside, it’s extremely charming–that may have something to do with those strings of white lights I’m always telling you about. Items range from wicker chairs, antique bed frames, art deco, old signs, bird cages, milk glass, vintage mirrors, milk glass, candles, well, you get the idea. The owner has a great eye, she chooses quality merchandise and arranges it in a very appealing way. Every time we come there’s always something new. The stable tour only happens once a year but you can take a nice scenic ride to horse country any time.

Stables 142 (1)

Stables 139 (1)

Stables 136 (1)

Detroit: This is Weird….

3 Sep

weird 025 (1)

To some Weird is distasteful, uncomfortable, unpleasant. In others it piques their interest, curiosity, a sense of adventure. Kris and I definitely fall into the second group, which is why when we learned Detroit was hosting its first Weird Homes Tour we purchased tickets immediately. WHT are given in Austin, Portland, Detroit, Houston and New Orleans; 10% of gross ticket sales go to a local non-profit. Addresses are not given out until a day or two before the event. The tours are self-paced, self-driving visits to homes of artists, architects, collectors; you never know what you’ll see.  

weird 009 (1)weird 015 (1)

weird 008 (1)

weird 016 (1)

We decide to attack the map from east to west; I feel like I’m on a scavenger hunt, I’m really excited about what we’re going to see today, one never knows what hidden gems are right under our nose… I love when things exceed my expectations, the first house definitely does. From the art gallery just inside the front door to the art on the walls, bold colors, vintage furnishings, to the hand painted murals to the pool on the roof, all I can say is Wow! Down a narrow hall, we enter a vast space filled with great pieces of furniture arranged around a very modern and unique fireplace. The building is constructed of grey cinder blocks, huge windows make the space bright, a circular theme is carried out in the round kitchen, circular stairway and black and white spiral on the kitchen floor. The owner created much of the art work herself, including the fireplace; furniture and accessories have been collected for more than 20 years. We exit through a doorwall onto the patio, a small table and chairs rest against a mural, up a flight of metal stairs we reach the roof. On the deck another mural serves as a backdrop to a small circular pool surrounded by lounge chairs and seating areas, greenery fills planters, massive trees in the distance make us feel far away from the city. What a way to start the tour!

weird 017 (1)

weird 021 (1)

weird 018 (1)

The next stop couldn’t be more different. The owners of this quirky Victorian home have lived here for about 30 years. Through the Detroit Land Bank Authority the owners were able to purchase the rubble-filled side lot for $100. They’ve turned that space into a gorgeous cut flower farm called Detroit Abloom . Their office is located here along with a flower arranging shed, a hoop house and a root cellar. A few blocks away they have a larger flower farm, a few blocks from that is their vegetable garden; yep, farms, in a neighborhood, in the city. We walk under the purple pergola and step into the hoop house to find baskets of heirloom tomatoes and bars of lavender soap for sale. The place is amazing, so green and lush, so many plants, so many beautiful things. We walk next door to the multi-hued home, the purples and blues give it a whimsical feel. Inside we find all of the lovely characters of an old home, wet plaster walls, archways between rooms, built-ins, hardwood floors.

weird 027 (1)

weird 030 (1)weird 036 (1)

weird 028 (1)

There’s a funky little house near Eastern Market that seemed to just pop up one day out in the middle of nowhere, it’s the next house on our tour. If you’ve been to eastern Market you’ll recognize the house immediately, its covered in colorful hand-painted murals, lots of bright blue, red and a guy’s head with a house coming out of the top–yes, that one. The 900 sq. ft. home was built by Cranbrook Architectural Masters students; the home is their thesis statement. We spend a lot of time walking around the outside admiring the paint job, I really like the green and blue, lacey, spiro-graph-thingy’s all along the bottom. I learned that it is built of a mix of modern and salvaged materials and the upstairs wall is finished with tongue and flooring from a 1913 house. Want to see it for yourself? You can book a stay here through airbnb.

weird 043 (1)

weird 056 (1)

weird 055 (1)

You’ve probably heard about homes and businesses being built out of steel cargo shipping containers. Did you know that these containers naturally meet all building and safety codes? Using containers saves about 25% over lumber construction, buildings go up in about half the time and can cut energy costs by 70%. How do I know this? I learned it at the next house on the tour. We’re at the Model Center of Three Squared, this 2,800 sq. ft. home itself was constructed of 6 containers; 3 layers of 2 side-by side containers, 3 more were stacked to create a balcony on each level. The exterior has that sort of modern look about it, it’s attractive in olive-green and russet. The open-concept interior is well laid out, family room, kitchen, island, dining room, all well decorated; my favorite thing is the black and white photo-wallpaper of the old Corktown Neighborhood sign. It’s really nice, the corrugated walls add interest. Giant blueprints of the home line the stairway wall, this is actually 2 units, a 2-story, 2 bedroom unit (the first and second floor) and a 1-bedroom unit on the third floor. 

weird 063 (1)

weird 073 (1)

weird 068 (1)weird 066 (1)

weird 077 (1)

How about some lunch? We go from the shipping container house to Detroit Shipping Company, a restaurant collective, beer garden like space made from 21 refurbished shipping containers on Peterboro. Right now there are three food-truck-style eateries, two full service bars, indoor and courtyard seating and a gallery. At Brujo Tacos and Tapas we order 3 of today’s tacos. I grab a table and wait for the food while Kris gets us a beer. The corn on the cob from Coop Caribbean Fusion is outstanding! Cooked perfectly it’s loaded down with tamarind aioli, toasted coconut, queso fresco and cilantro; seriously the best corn we’ve ever had. The tacos are delicious; bbq chicken, the pickles on top are a nice touch, lamb chorizo, just the right amount of spice and curry vegetable, a nice twist on a taco. When we’re done eating we take a look around, it’s a really great place, upstairs in the West Gallery the featured artist for August is Jacinto, “A Detroit State of Mind” we really like his work. We walk through lounges and exit to the balcony overlooking the courtyard, what is it about those strings of white lights that we all like so much? Armadillo Printwear does on-demand screen printing, stop in pick out a shirt, a design and bam they print it up for you while you wait. They are also responsible for all of the Detroit Shipping Co merch. A coffee and ice cream shop along with two more restaurants are in the works, come check it out.

weird 141 (1)

weird 154 (1)

weird 147 (1)

weird 151 (1)

Back on the road we arrive at our 5th house on the tour. Wrist-banded tourists from across the country mill about the 3-story craftsman style home in a vibrant, historic neighborhood. The owners, both artists, have a fascinating collection of art and novelties like the antique pigeon racing clock from Belgium. There are mini-collections everywhere; yarn sculptures, pigs, pop bottles, lots of odd do-dads. The hand-made, stop motion, photography pieces were created by the owners.  Upstairs everyone is marveling at the beer-cap-mosaic floor in the bathroom, must have been fun getting supplies for that one…

weird 109 (1)weird 095 (1)

weird 092 (1)

weird 086 (1)

 

The Bankle Building on Woodward in Midtown Detroit is not your ordinary building. This is the half-time home of automotive designer and artist Camilo Pardo. Inside, large automotive oil paintings are a blast of color against stark white walls, a messy work table and blank canvases are a sign of works-in-progress. Tulip chairs, Egg chairs, chrome sculptures show the artist is clearly a fan of mid-century and pop art. The art in the adjoining space is more female-centric. We even get to see where he stores his ’67 Mustang.

weird 175 (1)

weird 173 (1)

weird 185 (1)

The next house is a little further away but worth every mile to get here.  The exterior of the home provides no clue to what we’ll see inside, kind of mysterious.  Immediately we understand the owner is a collector with an amazing talent for displaying her treasures. Every wall is a collage, each room has a theme. The yellow room is an homage to music; boom boxes are grouped together, she even has a boom box pillow, cassette tapes, vinyl albums and then the unexpected–necklaces, fun right? Every room holds another surprise; video games, religious items, Jazz, framed magazine covers, a sassy red couch. The basement is her showroom for her business Dollface Couture, along with her statement clothing we find a far-out couch, a burger telephone and a sweet doll collection. Fun and stylish indeed.

weird 132 (1)weird 130 (1)

weird 119 (1)

weird 136 (1)

weird 122 (1)

We’ve reached the last home on the tour, as soon as we see the exterior and the vintage green Oldsmobile in the driveway we know we’re going to love it. Mid-Century and Magnificent is the description in the booklet, they nailed it. The house was built in 1963, miraculously it has made it to 2018 without any remodeling. The couple that lives here now totally get the house, they’ve embraced and furnished it just as it would have been 55 years ago; it’s awesome. Look at the fireplace, the bar, the original Nutone built in radio, the booth-seating in the kitchen, and the light fixtures…Did I mention the geometric wall of mirrors? How cool is that. Of course it doesn’t hurt that the owners have been collecting mid-century decor for a couple of decades. It has been a wild, wonderful and delightfully weird day, I wouldn’t have it any other way.

weird 186 (1)

weird 192 (1)

weird 189 (1)weird 194 (1)

weird 191 (1)