Tag Archives: Eat

Detroit: Still Weird…

5 Dec

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Growing up in the 1970’s I was surrounded by orange, purple, magenta and lime green. Clothing was covered in paisley or flower patterns, cereal came with a prize inside, I had the entire collection of Freakies. In other words it was a brightly colored, funky world to navigate. Today the trend leads much more towards white, grey and beige; it’s all a little plain for me. That’s probably why I love the “Weird Homes Tour” so much; unconventional and fun you never know what you’re going to find inside. Let’s get started.

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We start at a Mid-Century apartment complex in Royal Oak, The Boom Boom Museum as it’s called is a large second floor apartment decorated top to bottom, side to side, not a bare spot in the place. Kris and I step inside, awesome comes at us from every direction; we seem to naturally gravitate towards the tiki-ish bamboo bar. It’s a great room filled with south sea, palm-like, nautical things with a Mid-Century flare; I’d call it great. We follow the flow of people into a more serene sitting area with more great furnishings and original art. The family room is anchored by one orange wall, a record collection and lots of eye-catching accessories, it’s not possible to take it all in. The bedroom is a mix of mod and modern-day, the painting depicting Christine Beatty brings a laugh to everyone in the room. Down a short hall a smaller room holds another bar next to a door wall that leads to a terrace–very nice. The crowd in the kitchen has evaporated giving us a chance to look around; the chandelier is super-cute, the mushroom canisters remind me of my childhood. On the way back to the car we pause to check out the pool, it looks very inviting. It’s nice to see a place where the owners know what they have and appreciate it for what it is rather than gut the complex and modernize it.

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Still in Royal Oak our next stop is a private home in a regular neighborhood. The unassuming beige bungalow shows no hint of what resides behind the front door. From the moment we step inside it’s apparent the people who live here love art, color and design. Wall colors span the rainbow from bright green, turquoise, pink to sherbet and lemon. My favorite room is the kitchen, look at the wallpaper, all of those flowers in green, blue and purple. I’m a sucker for a Tulip table and chairs; the light fixture and centerpiece rock. Each room takes on the personality of the family who lives here; original art, baby photos, personal collections. Old, new, high end, garage sale finds, it all works together.

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Our next destination is 12087 Klinger in Hamtramck, otherwise known as Hamtramck Disneyland. We’ve taken you here before, it’s been a while so lets take another look. This is the folk art installation created by artist Dmytro Szylak atop the two garages on the property he owned. Szylak moved here from Ukraine in the 1950’s, after his retirement from GM in the 1980’s his creativity took shape into this whimsical, colorful collection of handmade and found objects, posters, photographs, kinetic structures that once lit up and played music, much to the delight of everyone who set eyes on it. A year after Szylak’s death Hatch Art took ownership of the properties and continues the legacy of Hamtramck Disneyland. Today many of the pieces have been restored, repainted and rehung. Clowns, soldiers, horses, a miniature soccer game, windmill and the old familiar airplane hang out in the backyard, wind-driven pieces look anxious to get back to work; the colors are more vibrant, it all looks a little fresher since the last time we were here. The garage is littered with paint cans, saws and hand-painted signs. Standing in the alley looking at the installation as a whole I’m reminded of the “Hidden Pictures” I used to love in the Highlight’s Magazine I used to get as a kid; how many cats do you see? Can you find the dragon, Mickey Mouse or the windmill?

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The next weird home is on Farnsworth in Detroit, completely tucked away on a quiet, tree-lined block you’d never guess what’s inside. Through the front door a normal sitting room is off to the right, artwork brightens up an ordinary wall, entering the kitchen is like walking into technicolor; have you ever seen a refrigerator painted orange, yellow and blue? The hardwood floor is laid out at an angle. My focus starts to narrow in on singular objects, the antique stove, leaded glass cabinet doors, old coffee tins, stained glass fixture, vintage pieces everywhere. We meander from room to room, the first bathroom has a spectacular herringbone pattern floor, the warm shades of the ceramic tile blend beautifully with the surrounding tones. The shower in the second bath has an angular ceiling and lovely glass baubles. In the main part of the home a large window overlooks other spaces, a couple of visitors are below checking out the pinball machine; again antiques are used to accent every available space. Then there’s the workshop… I see cool stuff everywhere. A juke box, a pulley system, an entire woodshop, industrial items and a bunch of eclectic things all surrounded by knotty pine walls. 

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If you’ve ever driven down Wilkins St near Eastern Market you may have wondered to yourself, “what are all of those metal sculptures doing there?” The answer is, this is the home of Detroit Gallery of Metals, a cultural institution established to celebrate, preserve and explore the role of metal arts in Detroit and around the world. Wandering around the fenced-in-yard we sip on wine and snack on cheese and crackers provided by our host. The pieces exhibited are fascinating to look at, I especially like the red windmill-like pieces. Our host announces the beginning of the tour, a dozen or so of us gather round and listen as he shares some Detroit history, then explains the fundamentals of his vision for the institution. We are led inside passing antique metal gates, projects, and finished pieces; this is one of the most unique places I’ve ever seen. Check out the chair, the spindles are human figures, metal statues silently greet us, stained glass windows are lit by the sun piercing the outside windows. Upstairs we are immersed in a world of metal; over 500 metal artifacts and works of art ranging from Berlin, Germany to Benin, Nigeria surround us. Ornate shelves hold a myriad of metal parts, frames, railings, statues, gates, blueprints, photographs surround us. A museum-like display sits perfectly at home in this metal wonderland, questions are asked and answered, photos taken. Until now I had no idea what this place was all about, so glad to have the opportunity to see and learn.

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The last home on our list is the Detroit Artist Test Lab on Mack. On the outside it appears to be a standard place of business, inside the space has been turned into a reception area for today’s tour. The lower floor is divided into work spaces for an artist, screen printing, a pod cast area and a bartender school. Upstairs is the owners private residence. The second floor is a combination rental photography studio and living space. Is that Mayor Mc Cheese over there? Quirky furniture shares it’s attention with hanging objects, a tiki bar, personal collections, family photos, large light fixtures and vintage pieces. The location of the sitting area is perfect, all that natural light and a view too!

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Our sole focus now is food; I hope there’s not a line when we get to Chili Mustard Onions… We park around the corner from the quaint red-brick building, I open the door and spot empty tables–whew! We are seated immediately, handed menus and asked for our drink order. We quickly decide what to have, place our order and can now relax in the nicely decorated dining room. CMO as it’s often called is a completely vegan/vegetarian restaurant, that’s right, gotta have that coney dog, craving a Big Mac but don’t eat meat? This is the place for you. The restaurant has been such a hit since opening just over a year ago that it’s hard to get a table, even at off-times. I look around at people enjoying their Beetball sub, Big Mock, Chicken Parm sandwich and gyro, fries seem to accompany every dish. Our coney dogs arrive, you wouldn’t know they’re meatless to look at them. We dig right in, alternating between bites of the coney and the waffle fries smothered with vegan cheese, bacon bits, sour cream and green onion, there’s a lot of food here! We are not vegan but enjoy all types of food, everything here was very good with generous portions and friendly service.

Cars at the Crossroads…

20 Jul

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The 1960’s brought Urban Renewal to the city of Flint.  ‘Progress’ often means the demolition of historic buildings and neighborhoods; such was the case as plans for constructing I-475 meant losing important pieces of Flint and Genesee County history. The first two buildings that garnered public attention were the Buzzell house and the Wisner carriage barn. Recognizing their importance, the highway commission donated the buildings, they were moved to the Genesee County Recreation Area where they still stand today; hence Crossroads Village was born. The Sloan Museum in Flint is part local history museum, part transportation museum; it holds a unique collection of 100 vehicles and archives telling the story of the significance Flint and Genesee County have played in the development of the American automobile industry. Its namesake, Alfred P Sloan was once longtime president and Chairman of the Board of GM. The museum is currently closed for renovation therefore the 47th Annual Sloan Museum Auto Fair is being held on the grounds of Crossroad’s Village.

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We park in a large grassy area and make our way the to the village entrance in the scorching heat, at only $7 a person, it’s a bargain. We follow the dusty road into town, at first glance it appears we’ve gone back in time; 19th century buildings line the street, antique cars are parallel parked, village employees are dressed in period costumes. The first block of block of buildings includes the general store, opera house Dr. Barbour’s office and the dry goods shop; the original buildings were located in Fenton and rebuilt at Crossroads for the 1978 season. Notice the FLT in the brickwork of the opera house, it stands for the Odd Fellow’s motto: Friendship, Love and Truth. Antique cars are parked in front; there’s an old 1930’s Ford with a wood body, a 1900’s yellow Buick with brass lamps, a grey Buick from the 19-teens sits in front of the lovely T.N. North & Son bank. We traverse our way through shops, go upstairs to see the opera house, the Singing Minstrels are coming on soon. Buildings are furnished with artifacts from 1860-1880; every effort was made to make this a living village from the post Civil War era.

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Further down the street it’s nice and shady; there are over 30 structures at Crossroads, some are brick, many are white-painted wood. In front of the Clayton Town Hall a Ford Model A has yellow spoke wheels, the body is two-tone, black and green. This year’s spotlight is “A History of Stock Cars” and look, there are some right here. The green 1969 Hemi Charger 500 is gorgeous, they made less than 100 of these. I’ve always liked the orangey- butterscotch color on the 1970 Cyclone Spoiler, don’t you love the red and white 1969 Mercury Cyclone? This one is unique, it’s a Cale Yarborough Special. The checkered flag emblem on the ’55 Dodge Stock Car is super-cool, the 1970 Superbird race car looks track-ready.

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We walk past Master’s Orchard then stop in at the church to have a look around; did you know people have weddings here? Such a great venue. There’s a sign up ahead directing us to a large open area to the right, a long line of vintage tractors form an aisle. John Deere, is the most popular brand with a few other brands thrown into the mix. There’s a pretty red barn built into the hill, it has the sliding doors that are so popular now. Stretched out in front of us is a wide variety of original, custom and restored cars and trucks. Where do we start? The 1967 Charger looks great in turquoise, the 1965 Mercury Colony Park woody station wagon is awesome! Look at that wood trim, you could haul a lot of stuff with this car. We zig and zag as different vehicles grab our attention, I think I’ll stand in the shade an look at the 1967 Coronet R/T and the blue ’78 Trans Am. Custom trucks are always fun to look at, the green Chevy C-10 is well done. Oh and the luxury cars… The 1960 Buick Electra convertible is sweet.

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We wander some more, this time stopping in buildings. The Buzzell House was the first building brought here, built in 1854 by John Buzzell the home was lived in until 1968. The home and furnishings are modest but comfortable looking. The Eldridge-Hanner house is quite affluent in comparison; rooms are larger, furnishings are a bit fancier, detailed plaster is found in ceiling medallions. Blacksmiths are hard at work in the Wisner Carriage Barn. Judge Charles H Wisner built the barn in the Italianate style back in 1878. He served as the 12th Governor of Michigan and built the very first automobile ever constructed in Flint. See how amazing the history of this area is. All throughout the village you’ll find sights and sounds of what life was like back then. In the print shop we watch and listen as typesetting is demonstrated, we watch a young woman as she makes brooms, in the fall you see cider-pressing and butter churning. There’s an ice house and a meeting hall, a mid-20’s Model T is parked in front of the Mason Inn.

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Down by the lake is the 1912 Charles W Parker carousel. We step inside, the ride is still, horses anxiously await visitors. A display explains the restoration process the horses went through, there’s just something about a carousel that guarantees a smile. We loop back around, vintage motorcycles are parked on the wooden sidewalk.

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Harley and Indian models span the decades. The seat’s on the 30’s motorcycles look like they could use a little more padding… Over by the Sweet Shop a crowd has gathered around the 1956 Buick Century X. The car is one-of-a-kind, built for designer Bill Mitchell, GM’s design staff president for 18 years. I can see what all the fuss is about. The blue is an outstanding color, the interior matches it with just a splash of red on the door panels. The front seats rotate, you can turn your seat to get in and out of the car and the passenger can turn the seat to face the rear, on top of that, it’s a convertible! Mitchell and his team incorporated all kinds if unique details; the exhaust exits through the rocker panel trim, it has power headrests, a console, special Century and Buick script and trim. Current owner Don Mayton found the car back in 1991 on the west side of Michigan, he purchased it in 1995. He has been able to document that the car belonged to Bill Mitchell and spent years researching and restoring the car; well done!

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We head to downtown Flint for a late lunch, we have been meaning to try Table & Tap on Saginaw St, today’s the day. The patio is inviting but the air conditioning inside is bordering on frigid, inside it is! The restaurant offers 30 Michigan craft beers on tap and homemade BBQ smoked daily. Our server greets us quickly with menus and icy glasses of water, we order fast then decompress from the heat. Our food arrives on a metal tray, we can’t wait to dig in. I try the mac and cheese first, crispy on top, creamy sauce and el dente noodles, delicious. The cole slaw has a kick of garlic, nice. The Smoke-House sandwich is pulled pork topped with bacon and white cheddar on a brioche bun, it’s really, really good. There are 6 homemade sauces on the table, if you squirt out a puddle of each you can have a different sauce with every bite. The homemade chips dipped in the onion sauce are excellent. It’s been a fun day. Content, we can just sit and relax before we point the car south toward home.

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The Burbs: Natural History…

17 Jun

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Sometimes you just want to be out in nature; fortunately the metro area has plenty of options. Today we’ll enjoy the beauty of nature and explore some amazing local history in the Shelby Twp, Rochester area. Our journey begins at River Bends Park, covering nearly 800 acres the park offers ball fields, soccer fields, trails for walking, hiking and biking, an archery range and rental pavilions. Let’s start at the Burgess-Shadbush Nature Center. Just outside the building we find a beautiful garden, I can’t resist gardens. A sign tells us this section is filled with deer-resistant plants, I find that a hopeful statement… Barberry shrubs are vibrant colors, several stunning varieties of Iris are in bloom, the purple Columbine are so pretty. Inside a gated area we find an attractive combination of annuals and perennials, I’ve never seen a smoke flower before, poppies are ready to burst open, white anemone, pink hardy geraniums bloom on this late spring day.

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Inside the nature center a large stone fireplace, picture windows overlooking the woods and knotty pine make us feel like we’re up north. Aquariums hold lizards, snakes, a leopard frog (I think he’s awesome) and other amphibians. I get a kick out of watching turtles swim, two are stacked on top of each other in a roomy tank by the wall. Displays identify different species of turtles, birds and rodents. Maps mounted to a wall show us the parks of the 1920’s-30’s; have you heard of Swiss Valley, Green Glen or Broadway? Look at the way the river twists and turns. It seems the Clinton River was the top recreation spot for people living in Detroit back in the day. In the next room photos and descriptions lay out the history of the area, pretty fascinating stuff. From 1850-1864 part of the land was Spring Hill Farm. Landowners Sarah and Peter Lerich were known for their strong views on anti-slavery. Peter dug a spring for the farm and enlarged the spring house to form a cavity that could hide several people, a large Cedar tree atop the spring house was known as the Beacon Tree, marking it as a station on the Underground Railroad.

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In 1939 Joe Louis purchased Spring Hill which was then a well-known riding establishment; he was an avid horseback rider. Mr Louis made many changes to the farm; he added a track at the bottom of the hill for horse shows along with bleachers and box seats. The house was renovated and made into a restaurant and nightclub (really!) I saw a photo of an old postcard featuring the house with a map of the location, it reads: Joe Louis’ Spring Hill Farm “A Good Place To Eat And Drink”. I’ll bet it was something to see! He used the farm as a training camp to prepare for fights. He lost the property due to financial difficulties, the Michigan Conservation Department purchased the property in 1944.

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In another section of the park the first large Public Works project in Michigan was getting underway in 1838; the Clinton and Kalamazoo Canal. The canal would have made it possible to cross Michigan by boat from Lake St. Clair to Lake Michigan. Lack of finances ended the project in 1843 after only 12 miles of the canal were completed. Evidence of the canal can be found in several places. Walking from photo to photo one in particular grabs my attention. In 1957 the farm became one of four Nike Missile Bases in the Detroit area. It was manned by members of Battery B-516th AAA Missile Battalion until 1964. In 1974 the Michigan DNR regained control of the land and added it to the Rochester/Utica state recreation area. 

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Time to get out in the fresh air. We follow the back stairway down the steep hill to the Boardwalk Trail, the sky has cleared, we are surrounded by tranquility. Mushrooms sprout from fallen trees, everything around us is green and lush, woodland flowers are in bloom, it looks as if the boardwalk will be enveloped by plants soon. The trail leads us through the Tamarack Swamp, deer travel the ridge trail above us, sweet honeysuckle scents the air. The trail ends at the river, the water level is high, we turn around, going back the way we came. Extending our time outdoors we head east following the old forgotten trail along the ridge. The terrain changes from grassy to sandy to forest. Birds sing, deer are busy eating but take off as we approach. Remnants of the past are found in piles of railroad ties, concrete pads, partial structures of things that fell down or burned down over the years. The land has come full circle and is wild again.

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It’s Tuesday, if we time it right we can get over to Bloomer Park in Rochester Hills and watch the cyclists practice at the International Velodrome. The IVBP is an outdoor, 1/8 mile/200m oval with banking from 13-44 degrees. Paid for with private donations and built by volunteers from the cycling community, it was given to the city of Rochester Hills. A lone bicyclist is taking laps on the track. We get right up to the railing and have a good look, the bank looks steep to me but the rider handles it effortlessly. Kris notices a tunnel that leads to the center of the track, we traipse down the hill, find an asphalt path and enter the interior of the track. Wow, this is cool. More riders have arrived, they’re putting on their equipment as we wander over to them. One strikes up conversation with us, he lets me lift his bike, at less than 15 lbs I’m shocked at how light it is. All three riders are out on the oval now, they stay in pack form as we watch, each lap takes them a little higher. There are races here every Friday night throughout the summer, we’ll have to come back and catch one.

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Exploring the park further we find ourselves at the stone shelter, to me it looks like an old ski lodge. Built during the depression by the Civilian Conservation Corps, it’s made up of big stones, wood-shingle roof, wood ceiling, the far wall is a fireplace; so charming. We walk around inside then out the back to the balcony overlooking the park; you can follow the nearly 200 steps to the bottom of the hill. Did you know there was a ski jump right around here in the 1920’s? The story goes like this, ski jumping was very popular during the roaring 20’s, 6 brothers from Ishpeming MI formed the Detroit Ski Club in 1925, purchased 11 acres of land from the Newberry Farm on Bloomer Rd then spent $40,000 to build a competition-grade ski jump standing 112 feet atop Newberry Hill’s 230 ft elevation. More than 10,000 people attended its inaugural competition. The jump was destroyed by high winds in 1934 and rebuilt, it was destroyed again by winds in the 40’s, it was never replaced. 

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I’m hungry. A few minutes later we’re standing in line at Lipuma’s Coney Island on Main Street in downtown Rochester. We’ve been coming here forever and are never disappointed. I order the food, Kris grabs a table, a moment later my tray is loaded with food. It’s beautiful out on the deck, we relax to the sound of the river flowing by and the chatter of ducks. It doesn’t take long for us to polish off our food; 2 tacos for me, a Chicago dog and a Mexican dog for Kris. This is good stuff. For dessert we head to Dino’s Cookie Dough Bar on University. With more than a dozen flavors it’s not an easy decision, thank goodness they give you samples to try; butterscotch it is. A sweet ending to a great day.

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DETROIT: New Kids on the Block…

19 Apr

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 We’re parked near the Opera House, the meter is full and my sweet-tooth is talking to me. Good thing Dilla’s Delights is only a short walk away. The donut shop is owned by Herman Hayes, aka Uncle Herm to late Detroit Hip Hop legend J Dilla. Dilla’s two daughters are the ‘delights’ in the equation. The petite shop is tucked into the end space on the ground floor of the Ashley Building, decor consists of photos of old Detroit, baseball players, portraits and posters of Dilla. The main attraction of course is the donuts. Made with organic flour and fried up in the kitchen at Avalon bakery, Uncle Herm offers 15 flavors including vegan options. It’s a tough decision; Brewster’s Banana Pudding Cake, apple fritter, Cakeboy Chocolate Cake, cinnamon raisin, blueberry. We follow the advice of the man behind the counter; one of the original classic John Doe Cake and a raised and glazed lemon lime; good advice. 

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Our walk continues to John R Street and the old Metropolitan Building, now the Element Detroit Hotel. Abandoned nearly 40 years, this is a perfect example of a building that nobody would have dreamed would be restored. Standing back we take in the 14-story, wedge-shaped, Neo-Gothic structure. The terracotta, brick and granite exterior is adorned with escutcheon and pieces of armor to accent the Gothic appearance. Built in 1925 it was informally nicknamed the jeweler’s building; floors 5-10 were leased to jewelers, diamond cutters, goldsmiths, watch-makers and silver workers. Other floors were leased to milliners, beauty and dress shops. Now part of Marriott’s Starwood Collection, it’s an extended-stay hotel. There are 3 restaurants planned including a rooftop cocktail lounge named the Monarch Club, Yesss…

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We step inside, walk a few feet then, taken aback by the beauty of the Great Hall, we just stop. Wow. Pink marble walls are topped by ornate plaster moldings, a beamed Medieval ceiling with cayenne-colored plaster rises above, glossy wood frames doorways and windows, simple globes and new recessed lighting light up red, yellow and blue designs high on the walls. The grand staircase is to the right, more pink marble and ornamental bronze grillwork. A quick trip to the second floor reveals terrazzo floors, divided storefronts and a large window overlooking the city. Returning to ground level we walk the hall marveling at the restored archways, magnificent plaster moldings, original floors. A lounge area displays large historic photographs of the Metropolitan in different phases. Decor hinges on Mid-Century here, the fireplace looks inviting. The Roxbury Group spent $33 million restoring this unique skyscraper, they’re the same group that restored the David Whitney Building/ Aloft Hotel. Nice job and Thank You!

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Farmer Street has been completely transformed. With the creation of the Shinola Hotel a new building stands where a short time ago was just a gravel lot. Up for a little shopping? Good Neighbor, a clothing boutique, sells casual pieces for men and women, if you’re into Levi’s you’re in luck, they have a large selection. Other items include jewelry, handbags, jackets, shoes and scarves. The Velvet Tower is next door, Long Island transplant Emily Bernstein has been collecting for over 2 years to amass enough vintage pieces to open her own resale shop. Pieces are high quality, she has a nice variety of casual and upscale pieces, hats, shoes, household and fun things. 

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Madcap Coffee has just opened its first location outside Grand Rapids, time for a coffee break. Roasting beans and serving coffee since 2008, we have enjoyed their offerings for years; now that they’ve arrived in Detroit we can indulge more often. The all white interior is accented in black, shelves hold logo merchandise, bags of coffee beans and several styles of pots to brew your own.  I’m glad to see they have nitro cold brew; one for me and one for Kris and we’re off again.

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A sharp right out of the building leads us to Parker’s Alley, a block-long walkway behind the new Shinola Hotel, a few independent storefronts face the alley. Remnants of old painted advertising still clings to the brick wall. Around the corner a 4-story enclosed bridge connects the hotel to the new building, large lights illuminate the walkway, planters already celebrate Spring. Organic raw juice company Drought has a location here. Their cold-pressed, glass-bottled juice has become the leading brand in the Midwest. The Lip Bar cosmetic boutique makes products that are vegan and cruelty-free. Have a seat on a swing at your own personal vanity; sample lipstick and lip gloss that moisturize your lips thanks to shea butter, coconut oil, avocado oil and vitamin E. Fun colors and cool packaging; what more could a girl want? The smallest space belongs to Posie Atelier, a charming florist that also sells houseplants, unique gifts and jewelry. I love the colors of exotic tropical flowers.

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Time to eat. Penny Red’s (Buckets and Biscuits) is a carry-out fried chicken stand located on the Farmer St side of the building. The modest space with wood paneling has a mid-century feel to it. There’s one window for ordering, one window for pick-up. Shelves in a recessed area hold rolls of paper toweling, secret recipe sauces, and disposable wood silverware. We place our order and are given a pager, we’re going to eat next door in The Brakeman. A simple doorway leads us into the beer and rec hall. It’s one huge, attractive, industrial-looking space that will seat 200 people at community or high-top tables. There are two bars, big screen TV’s, foosball, table shuffleboard, beer pong and ping-pong tables. You can even reserve a Beer Tap Table. Roll-up doors and windows run the length of the front and back of the building, this place will be packed in nice weather.

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A token booth stands at the far end, $7 gets you a token good for a single draught beer or a flight of three. I take my token to the bar serving beer and select a Short’s Soft Parade Shandy. The second bar serves cocktails and accepts cash. The pager goes off, I pick up the food and meet Kris back at our table overlooking Farmer Street. The food looks and smells delicious. The Classic sandwich is a chicken breast topped with urban ranch, sweet pickle and hot honey; very tasty. The crispy brussels are tender and flavorful with a smoked maple sauce and crunchy topping. Honey butter biscuits come dry or dunked, we got ours dunked, yum. Several times today I thought to myself, where am I? People fill the sidewalks and alley, empty spaces are disappearing as new buildings take their place. Travelers come and go from a long forgotten skyscraper. My eyes can hardly believe it. Detroit is alive and well.

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Port Huron: Floating Sculpture

3 Oct

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The Michigan chapter of the Antique and Classic Boat Society is hosting the 2018 ACBS International Boat Show on the Black River in Port Huron. Participants began arriving earlier in the week; group activities and tours through the St Clair Flats show people around the Blue Water Region, guides tell visitors about the amazing local boating history and legendary men Christopher Smith and Gar Wood. Boaters, collectors and curious people from the United States and Canada are gathered along the length of River Street Marina, nearly 200 boats have made the trek and are on display for the public. We arrive early in the day, fog hangs low, I hope it burns off soon. A stairway leads us down to the river bank, we start at the 10th Street bridge, looking ahead we can see boats double and triple parked all the way to the Erie Street bridge, crowds of people mingle along the sidewalk, excited visitors wearing orange life jackets line up for a free ride on a classic boat.

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We don’t own a classic boat, it’s the beauty, styling and craftsmanship that brings us here today. Chris Craft outnumbers brands such as Lyman, Century, Higgins, Larson, Gar Wood; each one unique and eye-catching. Mahogany, Teak, chrome, red is a popular interior color, signs are on display listing the brand, size, motor and owner’s name. The humidity is high, the fog beginning to lift as we proceed down the river. Some owners go to great lengths with their displays; Lily has her own lily pads, “Rhubarb” is here all the way from Washington State with lots of pretty little rhubarb details, tables are set, picnic baskets are filled with goodies, antique water skis are ready to go. Boat designs reflect the automobiles of the time; steering wheels, big chrome emblems, dashboards filled with gauges, knobs and levers, tinted windshields, chrome exhaust tips. Engine compartments are open, men on docks stand and stare, fiberglass bodies are designed like automotive fins, wide stripes, bright colors, so cool!

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All shapes and sizes are present; cruisers, runabouts, classic launch and utility. The Higgins is a showstopper in red and white, I love the wrap-around windshield. The two-toned Chris Craft looks sweet with a red interior, I’m liking the wooden boats with the black-painted sides too. Kris’s favorite so far is the 21′ 1961 Chris Craft Continental with a Lincoln 275 hp motor, it’s fabulous in turquoise, gold seat inserts and funky roof supports, it screams 1960’s. A pair of silver boats are tied to a dock, they look like something Batman would drive. I’m surprised how many boats have multiple levels, I can only imagine the view from the top. The woodwork and attention to detail is exceptional, everything was thoughtfully designed, beauty was as important as function. Restoration photos always blow my mind, the time and effort put in can only be described as a labor of love. My favorite photos are the ones of the father and son, brothers, best buddies, arms around each others back, wide grins, standing in front of the finished project.

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Vendors are set up on the grass, they come from all over to sell boat-centric items from jewelry and clothing to wax and ACBS souvenirs. The most adorable boat wagons I’ve ever seen, ok, the only ones I’ve ever seen, are for sale along with rocking horse boats and wooden boat hats, all very clever. We climb up the stairs pausing on the bridge, here we have a great view of the show, a whole different visual perspective of the boats, a gorgeous sight. Following the Black River we end up at the mouth where it joins the St Clair River, boats are filled with passengers coming and going, all enjoying the deep blue water and now sunny sky. Freighters pass in the distance, a little red boat with polka dot curtains looks minuscule in comparison. The old railroad bridge still reaches straight up, it’s become a bit of an icon, a landmark, I hope they never get rid of it.

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Walking back through the show we stop at several boats to get a closer look, some of the cruisers are open to the public to come aboard. This time I notice the steering wheel of Wilgold is on the left like a car. I ask around and learn that boat propellers turn clockwise. Hulls used to be designed in such a way that when there was torque on the prop the right side of the boat would rise up. The steering wheel was put on the right so the weight of the driver would counteract that. Modern hulls don’t have that problem but the design stuck. Most racing boats have the steering wheel on the left.  A trailer contains a Lyman display, photos show the old factory in its glory days in Sandusky OH. We actually stopped in that building last summer. It’s now event space but the owners have kept a bit of the Lyman heritage alive with boats and memorabilia.

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Back at 10th Street we climb the hill towards the parking lot. A group of antique cars are on display for the festivities. Packards, Pierce Arrow, Lincoln, Auburn (a boattail of course) and even a Wills Sainte Clair join the gathering. Ernest Camera Shop has a vehicle here with antique reproduction Kodak advertising on it, looks great. Time to get some food, it has turned into a perfect September day, waterside dining is a must.

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Courses is located in the Culinary Institute of Michigan, part of the Baker College system. Students get world-class training in baking and pastry, culinary arts, food and beverage management. Students learn the art and business side of the food service industry. The building sits on a grassy hill next to the old Thomas Edison Inn, now the Double Tree Hotel, overlooking the St Clair River, Canada and the Blue Water Bridge–how’s that for scenery? Students are the hosts, servers, bartenders and chefs. A tv above the bar allows you to watch the students at work in the kitchen. There’s an open table right in front of the windows, perfect, we are greeted quickly, given menus and water.  Our server arrives with the signature bread basket, takes our order and heads to the kitchen. We satisfy our hunger with pretzel rolls, cranberry bread, bread sticks and sweet muffins topped with blue cheese. The food arrives and we dig in without hesitation. I’m having today’s pasta which is fettuccine with a vodka sauce topped with roasted vegetables, it’s wonderful. Kris has the German stew, tender chunks of meat in a rich smoky sauce with peppers and onions topped with spaetzle, very good. Courses is open Wed-Fri from 11:30 – 2:00 when classes are in session. Check the website before you come, a reservation is never a bad idea. The food is delicious, prices are fair and the view is unbeatable.

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Detroit: This is Weird….

3 Sep

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To some Weird is distasteful, uncomfortable, unpleasant. In others it piques their interest, curiosity, a sense of adventure. Kris and I definitely fall into the second group, which is why when we learned Detroit was hosting its first Weird Homes Tour we purchased tickets immediately. WHT are given in Austin, Portland, Detroit, Houston and New Orleans; 10% of gross ticket sales go to a local non-profit. Addresses are not given out until a day or two before the event. The tours are self-paced, self-driving visits to homes of artists, architects, collectors; you never know what you’ll see.  

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We decide to attack the map from east to west; I feel like I’m on a scavenger hunt, I’m really excited about what we’re going to see today, one never knows what hidden gems are right under our nose… I love when things exceed my expectations, the first house definitely does. From the art gallery just inside the front door to the art on the walls, bold colors, vintage furnishings, to the hand painted murals to the pool on the roof, all I can say is Wow! Down a narrow hall, we enter a vast space filled with great pieces of furniture arranged around a very modern and unique fireplace. The building is constructed of grey cinder blocks, huge windows make the space bright, a circular theme is carried out in the round kitchen, circular stairway and black and white spiral on the kitchen floor. The owner created much of the art work herself, including the fireplace; furniture and accessories have been collected for more than 20 years. We exit through a doorwall onto the patio, a small table and chairs rest against a mural, up a flight of metal stairs we reach the roof. On the deck another mural serves as a backdrop to a small circular pool surrounded by lounge chairs and seating areas, greenery fills planters, massive trees in the distance make us feel far away from the city. What a way to start the tour!

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The next stop couldn’t be more different. The owners of this quirky Victorian home have lived here for about 30 years. Through the Detroit Land Bank Authority the owners were able to purchase the rubble-filled side lot for $100. They’ve turned that space into a gorgeous cut flower farm called Detroit Abloom . Their office is located here along with a flower arranging shed, a hoop house and a root cellar. A few blocks away they have a larger flower farm, a few blocks from that is their vegetable garden; yep, farms, in a neighborhood, in the city. We walk under the purple pergola and step into the hoop house to find baskets of heirloom tomatoes and bars of lavender soap for sale. The place is amazing, so green and lush, so many plants, so many beautiful things. We walk next door to the multi-hued home, the purples and blues give it a whimsical feel. Inside we find all of the lovely characters of an old home, wet plaster walls, archways between rooms, built-ins, hardwood floors.

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There’s a funky little house near Eastern Market that seemed to just pop up one day out in the middle of nowhere, it’s the next house on our tour. If you’ve been to eastern Market you’ll recognize the house immediately, its covered in colorful hand-painted murals, lots of bright blue, red and a guy’s head with a house coming out of the top–yes, that one. The 900 sq. ft. home was built by Cranbrook Architectural Masters students; the home is their thesis statement. We spend a lot of time walking around the outside admiring the paint job, I really like the green and blue, lacey, spiro-graph-thingy’s all along the bottom. I learned that it is built of a mix of modern and salvaged materials and the upstairs wall is finished with tongue and flooring from a 1913 house. Want to see it for yourself? You can book a stay here through airbnb.

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You’ve probably heard about homes and businesses being built out of steel cargo shipping containers. Did you know that these containers naturally meet all building and safety codes? Using containers saves about 25% over lumber construction, buildings go up in about half the time and can cut energy costs by 70%. How do I know this? I learned it at the next house on the tour. We’re at the Model Center of Three Squared, this 2,800 sq. ft. home itself was constructed of 6 containers; 3 layers of 2 side-by side containers, 3 more were stacked to create a balcony on each level. The exterior has that sort of modern look about it, it’s attractive in olive-green and russet. The open-concept interior is well laid out, family room, kitchen, island, dining room, all well decorated; my favorite thing is the black and white photo-wallpaper of the old Corktown Neighborhood sign. It’s really nice, the corrugated walls add interest. Giant blueprints of the home line the stairway wall, this is actually 2 units, a 2-story, 2 bedroom unit (the first and second floor) and a 1-bedroom unit on the third floor. 

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How about some lunch? We go from the shipping container house to Detroit Shipping Company, a restaurant collective, beer garden like space made from 21 refurbished shipping containers on Peterboro. Right now there are three food-truck-style eateries, two full service bars, indoor and courtyard seating and a gallery. At Brujo Tacos and Tapas we order 3 of today’s tacos. I grab a table and wait for the food while Kris gets us a beer. The corn on the cob from Coop Caribbean Fusion is outstanding! Cooked perfectly it’s loaded down with tamarind aioli, toasted coconut, queso fresco and cilantro; seriously the best corn we’ve ever had. The tacos are delicious; bbq chicken, the pickles on top are a nice touch, lamb chorizo, just the right amount of spice and curry vegetable, a nice twist on a taco. When we’re done eating we take a look around, it’s a really great place, upstairs in the West Gallery the featured artist for August is Jacinto, “A Detroit State of Mind” we really like his work. We walk through lounges and exit to the balcony overlooking the courtyard, what is it about those strings of white lights that we all like so much? Armadillo Printwear does on-demand screen printing, stop in pick out a shirt, a design and bam they print it up for you while you wait. They are also responsible for all of the Detroit Shipping Co merch. A coffee and ice cream shop along with two more restaurants are in the works, come check it out.

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Back on the road we arrive at our 5th house on the tour. Wrist-banded tourists from across the country mill about the 3-story craftsman style home in a vibrant, historic neighborhood. The owners, both artists, have a fascinating collection of art and novelties like the antique pigeon racing clock from Belgium. There are mini-collections everywhere; yarn sculptures, pigs, pop bottles, lots of odd do-dads. The hand-made, stop motion, photography pieces were created by the owners.  Upstairs everyone is marveling at the beer-cap-mosaic floor in the bathroom, must have been fun getting supplies for that one…

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The Bankle Building on Woodward in Midtown Detroit is not your ordinary building. This is the half-time home of automotive designer and artist Camilo Pardo. Inside, large automotive oil paintings are a blast of color against stark white walls, a messy work table and blank canvases are a sign of works-in-progress. Tulip chairs, Egg chairs, chrome sculptures show the artist is clearly a fan of mid-century and pop art. The art in the adjoining space is more female-centric. We even get to see where he stores his ’67 Mustang.

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The next house is a little further away but worth every mile to get here.  The exterior of the home provides no clue to what we’ll see inside, kind of mysterious.  Immediately we understand the owner is a collector with an amazing talent for displaying her treasures. Every wall is a collage, each room has a theme. The yellow room is an homage to music; boom boxes are grouped together, she even has a boom box pillow, cassette tapes, vinyl albums and then the unexpected–necklaces, fun right? Every room holds another surprise; video games, religious items, Jazz, framed magazine covers, a sassy red couch. The basement is her showroom for her business Dollface Couture, along with her statement clothing we find a far-out couch, a burger telephone and a sweet doll collection. Fun and stylish indeed.

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We’ve reached the last home on the tour, as soon as we see the exterior and the vintage green Oldsmobile in the driveway we know we’re going to love it. Mid-Century and Magnificent is the description in the booklet, they nailed it. The house was built in 1963, miraculously it has made it to 2018 without any remodeling. The couple that lives here now totally get the house, they’ve embraced and furnished it just as it would have been 55 years ago; it’s awesome. Look at the fireplace, the bar, the original Nutone built in radio, the booth-seating in the kitchen, and the light fixtures…Did I mention the geometric wall of mirrors? How cool is that. Of course it doesn’t hurt that the owners have been collecting mid-century decor for a couple of decades. It has been a wild, wonderful and delightfully weird day, I wouldn’t have it any other way.

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FLINT: Touring..

3 Aug

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Today we are about 66 miles northwest of Detroit in the city of Flint MI for the Be A Tourist In Your Home Town event. You have undoubtedly heard of the water crisis that started in 2014 and is still ongoing. Progress is being made; the city is back on the Detroit water system, lead pipes are being replaced, water is being monitored closely; it’s a process. A century and a half ago Flint was a center for the lumber industry, revenue from lumber financed the local carriage-making industry. As horse-drawn carriages were replaced by automobiles, Buick, AC Spark Plug and Chevrolet all took up residence here. By 1908 Buick became the largest manufacturer of automobiles thanks to William C Durant, founder of GM. The city thrived, beautiful buildings sprouted downtown, lovely neighborhoods were built. Then as it often happened to industrial cities, factories closed, moved away, jobs left; Flint was devastated. Today manufacturing still leads employment with medical and education not too far behind. These days the city is reaching out to the youth who attend U of M Flint, Mott, Kettering and Baker, making it more appealing for them to stay put with a revitalized downtown that includes new retail, coffee shops, cafes, trendy restaurants and breweries. We’re excited for the opportunity to show you the positive side of Flint.

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We purchase a wristband for $1 each, this gets us into historic buildings, bus tours and cultural institutions; a program lists attractions, participating restaurants and bus routes. The 7-story  Ferris Wheel Building is our first stop, built in the late 1920’s the Art Deco structure was the home to Pringle Furniture, Gainey Furniture and most recently Ferris Bros Furs; hence the name. At approximately 40,000 sq. ft. the building has been vacant for nearly 40 years. Now a shared workspace, the building is home to entrepreneurs, inventors, small businesses, a community meeting space and event venue. Foster Coffee Company is located on street level in what is basically the lobby of the building, a large seating area fills the main floor of the adjoining building, tables and counter seating along the front window are in the Ferris space. We order a couple of cold brew coffees, choose a vanilla bean scone and take up residence in the front window; the scone is outstanding and pairs perfectly with the rich, smooth coffee. Kris gets up and takes photos while I peruse the program, there’s a ton of things to see and do!

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A guided tour through the building is about to begin, we join the group. Everything is painted white as far as I can see, work tables and lounge areas are scattered throughout the main floor, black and white photos show the building when it was the fur company, Flint-centric items connect the past to the present. The office of 100K Ideas is to the right, they offer budding entrepreneurs guidance and assistance to take their business from ‘napkin sketch to prototype’, a few examples of success stories are on display. The tour moves upstairs, adjustable glass panels and doors allow tenant space to be reconfigured as needed, rent is paid on a month to month basis, if you don’t need an office you can just have access to the work areas for a smaller fee; currently there are over 40 members of Ferris Wheel. Up a couple of stories floor to ceiling windows provide a panoramic view of downtown, cozy seating areas are set up near front and back windows creating a waiting area for potential customers; a community kitchen is on each floor.  There’s a bit of a buzz on this floor as models race to and fro preparing for a fashion show. We take the stairs back to the mezzanine level overlooking the main floor, a new group of tourists has assembled in the lobby. It’s good to see so many people out exploring today.

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A short walk down Saginaw St. is Cafe Rhema, they are participating in today’s event with a discount for ‘tourists’, it’s lunch time so let’s check it out. This is the former Economy Shoes building, it was the first building to be renovated in the downtown area; there’s a small marquee on the front of the building with the name of the cafe spelled out in free-standing letters above, velvet ropes and a red carpet lead us to the door. Inside it looks like a place right out of the Roaring 20’s; charming seating areas have antique furnishings, vintage lighting, black and white photos complete the decor, it’s so pretty. The cafe serves craft coffee and espresso drinks, bubble tea, baked goods, sandwiches, salads and waffles. We order at the counter, employees are dressed in period clothing–think Great Gatsby, very cool. We sit at a community table with other couples also doing the tour today, we talk about what we’ve seen so far until the food arrives. The Puttin’ On The Ritz waffle is baked with apples and cinnamon, topped with whipped cream and maple syrup, it’s really good. The Prohibition Pig is a panini with honey-roasted ham, bacon, house infused bourbon bbq sauce, cheddar, sweet and spicy mustard on bread from Crust Bakery in Fenton, delicious! On our way out we stop at the counter again just to check out the desserts, they look amazing but we can’t eat another bite. Kris notices the taps, one says Espresso Root Beer, the other Brown Sugar Bourbon, turns out they make their own soda pop too. We try a sample of each, they’re excellent. The cafe is one of those really unique places you feel lucky to have found; from the staff to the menu to the decor, everything about it is well done.

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We walk through downtown, cross the Flint River on a pedestrian bridge to Carriage Town; this is where the automotive industry got its start in Flint. It’s funny how things come together. There were men with ideas, movers and shakers; Durant, Dort, Louis Chevrolet, David Buick, Alfred Sloan. The Durant-Dort Carriage Company, founded by Josiah Dallas Dort and William Crapo Durant, became the world’s largest volume producers of horse drawn carriages, which eventually evolved into automobiles and from all of this General Motors was born in 1908. Ok, that’s extremely simplified but you get the picture. We have arrived at General Motors Durant-Dort Factory One, it’s open to visitors today, let’s see what it’s all about. Originally established in 1886 as the Flint Road Cart Company, this historic Flint GM plant is referred to as the American automakers birthplace. The red-brick building has been completely restored; it’s now home to the Kettering Archive Collection which contains about 100,000 historical documents, photos and artifacts related to Flint’s GM history and the Factory One Conference Center. Statues of Dort and Durant stand close by, keeping an eye on things.

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A National Park Service sign in the lobby dedicates the building as a Motorcities Automobile National Heritage Area, a volunteer shows us which way to go. We’re in a large museum-like room, there’s a lot to look at. Glass cabinets display Flint football memorabilia; programs, trophies, a football and a varsity letter. Framed black and white historic photographs of factory buildings, people and advertisements hang on exposed brick walls. A small collection of items belonging to David Buick are grouped together, antique automotive parts and modern pieces sit side by side, vintage advertisements rest on easels. In the reference area leather-bound manuals fill bookshelves, they even have the mini-carriage used for the Fisher Body logo–next time you’re in the Fisher Building in Detroit look for the logo. 

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In the conference center you really get a feeling for the age of the building, look at those original wooden beams; much of the original structure still exists. Beautiful antique automobiles take center stage, I like the white wheels and tires on the midnight blue Buick, I’m happy they saved the original stone lettering from the Buick factory. You had to have lots of windows to let sunlight in back in those days, the whole room is awash in natural light. A short film is about to start, we take seats at round tables to watch. The film takes us through Flints early days as a mecca of the wagon industry, how David Buick’s plumbing expertise helped him to design his internal combustion engine, how Durant bought up several automakers and brought them together under GM, did you know he lost GM not once but twice? Every time I watch a historical film like this my mind wanders to the local road names, I say to myself, oh, that’s where Dort Hwy came from or I didn’t know there was really a guy named Chevrolet. History is fascinating and we’re having fun at the same time.

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Up North: Random Acts of Leisure…

18 Jun

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We start our morning on Sturgeon Bay  It’s Tuesday, a normal day for the rest of the world, kids are in school, folks are at work, there’s not a soul around. We park along the side of the road and walk out to the lake, the only sound we hear are waves lapping at the shore. I reach down into the crystal clear water, it’s cold. Yellow butterflies flutter around our heads then cluster together on the sand. After a time we drag ourselves back to the car and make our way south.  We drive through the Tunnel of Trees, M119, one of the most scenic drives in Michigan; high upon a bluff, Lake Michigan on our right, a sea of Trillium on our left. There’s something in the road ahead, Kris comes to a stop, it’s a fox, he trots casually across the narrow road, finds a comfy spot in the tall grass and makes himself at home. Just ahead is Trillium Woods Vintage Boutique and coffee shop, we grab a couple of espresso’s and continue. 

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Pond Hill Farm is home to a winery, brewery, cafe and farm store; open year-round it has become an agritourism destination. We turn in off of M119, parking is plentiful. Walking toward the rustic buildings we stop and watch as a group of girls pick, rinse and pack fresh rhubarb. Look at those stalks, the fade from green to red, we stop to talk, when offered a taste I eagerly accept; it’s kind of tough on the outside but I manage to bite through, the inside is tart but pleasant, not bad. The market is loaded with goodies; fresh produce, wine, beer and rows and rows of canned goods made from scratch. You’ll find the usual jams, salsa and veggies but have you ever seen IPA Beer Jelly or Cherry Wine Jelly?

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I pick up some blueberry jam and a bottle of Spicy Peanut Sauce then join Kris upstairs. Cafe diners are eating on the deck on this beautiful day, we round the corner to the tasting room and take a couple of seats at the bar. Today’s beer list has some interesting offerings, we’re here for the wine. We taste several then order a glass of the Schoolhouse Red, it’s so good we buy a bottle for home. Outside we walk over to the vineyard, the vines are just coming to life as new leaves emerge on woody vines. Fields are mostly bare, greens grow robustly in the greenhouse. Baskets of flowers are everywhere, customers come and go in a constant stream carrying away Petunias, Geraniums, Begonias and Lobelia.

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About 5 miles down the road we find ourselves in downtown Harbor Springs. There’s this amazing area we keep wanting to check out called Wequetonsing, today is the day. Back in the late 1800’s We que ton sing (as they wrote it then) was originally a Presbyterian summer resort, in 1880 it changed hands so-to-speak and became a private association. I found the original By Laws of the association online, I love some of the descriptions, “the water approach to the grounds presents a picture of rare beauty; they rise from the water in gentle terraces, and are covered with a luxuriant growth of young trees in great variety…” how about “a safe and healthful place for families to reside during the heated season”. All are true. By 1888  12 trains passed daily during resort season between Petoskey and Harbor Springs with a stop at Wequetonsing, they had a train depot and a pier for small steamers, a large hotel had a dining hall that could seat 200; there were about 40 cottages built by that time. I imagine women with parasols and large hats, kids splashing in the water, men in suits and ties strolling the sidewalks. Though many things have changed, the beauty and the elegance, not to mention the magnificent cottages, still remain.

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A walk along Beach Drive is like going back in time. Going south you have a panoramic view of the north side of Little Traverse Bay on the right and stunning, historic cottages on the left. The cottages are immaculately kept; freshly mowed grass, porch boxes and planters filled with newly planted annuals, an American flag billows in the breeze. I will generalize and say most buildings are built in the Victorian style of architecture, there are definitely exceptions. Porches are large and can support several seating areas for optimal water views. Some cottages are still wearing their winter clothing, closed off with heavy visqueen sheeting. Craftsmen are hard at work making repairs or renovating before the summer season officially begins. White is the exterior color of choice, you’ll find some houses with a splash of color; spruce green, navy blue and a few in yellow. Lawns are deep green, trees and shrubs are filling out after the long winter; I find myself looking from side to side, lake-cottage, lake-cottage.

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Each home is unique; balconies, turrets, wide staircases, stone, fancy railings, look at that one with the bunting, oooh, this one has Geraniums lining the lengthy walkway, that yellow house is different, low and wide, look at that eyebrow window with the portholes. Some of them have names, I think Cedarmere is my favorite; a majestic beauty overlooking the shoreline. Common areas include a croquet court, I recognize the familiar sound of the mallet striking the ball. Three gentlemen dressed in white and wearing hats have just finished a game; now that it’s empty I can get a closer look, they have the same grass as a golf course for the court area, fancy white wickets pushed into the ground are all that remain of the game. This community was built during America’s industrial dynasty, I’m so happy to see it preserved.

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Our next stop on the tour is Boyne City  There have been a lot of changes over the last decade. Despite being located at the southeast end of Lake Charlevoix, the quaint little town had become stagnant. Local small businesses in the southern section of Boyne City came together and created the SOBO District, the city invested in itself and became a Main Street Community; downtown was revitalized, buildings restored, new development came in retail and residential. Boyne City is once again vibrant and active. There are 11 miles of lake frontage, parks, beaches and a boardwalk. Downtown is home to boutiques, restaurants, a bookstore, galleries and coffee shops.

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It’s getting late, most of the shops have closed. Freshwater Art Gallery’s doors are still open, fabulous things are everywhere. The one-of-a-kind bed is a real attention grabber, look at it, all handmade from wood and branches, imagine the dreams you’d have sleeping in it. Metal art, jewelry, glass, baskets, clever lamps. Kris likes the painted Up North scenes, the Northern Lights photos are very cool. The gallery also doubles as a concert venue.

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We walk around taking note of the lovingly restored buildings and public art, I’m thirsty so we drop in at Lake Street Market. This place has everything, food, drinks, cheese, baked goods, wine, art, and it has great rustic charm. Before we go we visit the Alpine Chocolat Haus, it’s just not vacation without ice cream. I can see we need to come back and spend more time here.

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Time to get back to Charlevoix The Beautiful. The shortest way to get there is to take the Ironton Ferry from Boyne City to Ironton; it crosses the south arm of Lake Charlevoix at a very narrow point. The 4-car ferry has been in operation since 1876, in those early days it was powered by horses; the onboard gates were electrified in the late 1970’s. We’re in luck, the ferry is on its way back and we’re first in line. The fare is only $1 today and worth every penny. I love that this ferry still exists. We reach Ironton on the other side, we’re about 5 miles from Charlevoix.

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Back at Abide we freshen up and put on nicer clothes for dinner at Grey Gables Inn Restaurant. Grey Gables is located in the Belvedere Club, like Wequetonsing, the Belvedere Club started out as the exclusive Charlevoix Resort Association in 1878, cottages continued to be built and in 1923 the name was changed to The Belvedere Club. The restaurant and Inn are original cottages from the 1930’s. Tonight is sushi night at Grey Gables. The restaurant is lovely, decked out to the max in Victorian decor; floral wallpaper, bold colors, frilly crystal chandeliers. The staff is friendly, servers attentive, at this time of year most of the patrons are local. We order 3 sushi rolls, while we wait our server brings us a bread basket, clearly he could tell we were hungry. We polish off the bread just as the sushi arrives; nothing fancy, a veggie roll, Sunny and an M-80, all was fresh and good. It has been a full day of beauty and delight. 

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Detroit: Corktown Bound..

22 May

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Detroit is a city known around the world for its past. We were a manufacturing mecca; we built ships, stoves, war planes, we put the world on wheels. The city gave birth to Motown, Techno. We are known for Coney Island hot dogs, cocktails such as the Hummer and the Last Word. Detroit was a city of inventors, artists and beauty. For a while the lights went out in our bright city but the spirit of Detroit never dimmed. Here we are, reinventing ourselves, again. The world has taken notice, Detroit is on the lips of people across the country and across the oceans. Urban farms, amazing architecture, an international waterfront, award-winning chefs, builders, makers and artists; the past and the future colliding. Downtown is lively again, people crowd the sidewalks on Woodward, something new opens in Midtown every week, restaurants are lined up out the door; it’s hard to keep up. Join us today as we explore some of Corktown’s latest offerings.

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A couple of charming brick buildings reside at the corner of Trumbull and Bagley, it doesn’t seem that long ago an aging market occupied some of the space, the buildings in need of some TLC. Now the buildings have been restored and repurposed, patios host diners, flower boxes mark off the perimeter, pedestrians are a common sight. The Farmer’s Hand is a compact, gourmet grocery store with a busy take-out counter. Fresh food and artisan products are all sourced from Michigan. The space is quaint, like an old-time corner store, here you can purchase fresh produce, regional cheese, wine, healthy snacks, specialty products like Gus & Grey‘s Sweet Jesus Jam or My Funny Clementine Marmalade. Fresh flower bouquets are beautiful, the pastries look delicious, dairy, juice, water and a variety of sodas fill the fridge. I like the old tin ceiling and the way everything mixes together creating a distinct aroma. They serve Hyperion Coffee, grab a latte and sit inside or head to the patio.

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Next door is Mama Coo’s Boutique, I love this shop. It’s kind of hard to describe; vintage, handmade, new, resale, art, themed pieces, all nestled together in one tiny space. Owner Lana Rodriguez was born and raised in southwest Detroit, she’s done a fabulous job hand-picking items and arranging them into eye-catching displays. An antique trunk, old tables and shelves are filled with interesting things; roller skates, canisters, ceramic ash trays, handbags. I’m a fan of old jewelry boxes, I remember when I was growing up how much I liked opening my mom’s jewelry boxes, taking out the pieces and putting them back, arranging them by color or size–costume jewelry of course. Racks of clothing, shoes, hats, knick-knacks, macrame, walls wear for-sale art. Southwest Detroit’s influence shows in Frida Kahlo charms, loteria and Mexican skull art. Every year Lana hosts a Prom dress drive and giveaway for local girls who otherwise would not have access to fancy, special occasion dress. If you have a prom dress, or two or three just sitting in the closet, consider donating them, there are so many girls who would love to have them. Did I mention I bought the cutest pair of hamburger earrings?

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Time to eat. FOLK is an artisanal cafe serving seasonal, made from scratch comfort foods. The restaurant is an extension of The Farmer’s Hand and owned by the same ladies. The restaurant is open until 3:00 pm and serves breakfast and lunch dishes. The corner space is light and airy, lots of white tile, live plants, communal tables, islands and a counter that overlooks the kitchen. We sit in a sunny window and decide quickly what we want to eat. The restaurant is paperless so we are given a number held in a tall metal stand. The yogurt bowl arrives first, turmeric tints the yogurt a pale yellow, a scoop of fruit compote and a helping of chia seeds complete the dish; it’s pretty tasty. The Big Guy is a breakfast sandwich with two eggs, cheese and a thick sausage patty, drizzled with sriracha sauce, served on a soft roll. A little pricey, but good. We are sharing a table with 2 women, one is having the daily special the other some sort of ‘bowl’, everything looks good. When we are finished we take our number to the counter where we are given a total and pay. 

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Over on Michigan Ave we pop into Metropolis Cycles, a full service bike shop. I really like this single-story building, the exterior brick is painted black and surrounds a large expanse of windows. Inside, bikes hang from exposed rafters, walls and stand in neat rows on the wood floor.  Exposed brick, antique wooden doors and potted plants make the shop cozy. Customers browse the selection of bicycles by Bianchi, Surly, Raleigh and Fairdale, lots to choose from.  Accessories are plentiful along with bike shorts, pants and shirts. A guy drops off his bike for a spring tune-up, everybody is anxious to get riding after the long winter. George Gregory is a men’s shop offering clothing and lifestyle goods. The shop is super-attractive, we are greeted by a sign that reads Hello Detroit, a bourbon-something-or-other candle burns on the counter and smells wonderful. Items are laid out in a way that encourages you to wander, pieces range a variety of price points. Khaki’s, casual shirts, swanky hats, shorts, t-shirts and belts share space with evening clothes, ties, shaving accessories and gym bags. The owner has a great eye. Definitely a place to keep in mind next time Kris updates his closet.

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The Happier Camper has an indoor showroom tucked away on Beech Street, a block or so off of Michigan Ave. We don’t camp but curiosity has gotten the best of us and we want to check out the trailers. We receive a warm welcome when we walk in the door, a campground scene is set up before us. A cute little trailer in white and fern green is on display, doors are open for easy access, modular pieces from the camper are laid out on a floor cloth. Happier Camper makes vintage-looking trailers with a modern, modular design. You can configure and reconfigure the modular interior system to suit your needs from camping to hauling to guest quarters; it’s not only cute it’s extremely clever. There’s a large rear hatch that makes loading and unloading a breeze, it can sleep 5 people. You can even upgrade your trailer with a stove top, shower, toilet, awning and 100 watt solar panel.All of the camper parts are made in the US–nice. Out in the loading area we take a peek at a Detroit Tiger’s themed unit, orange and navy blue with a Tiger’s logo. The colorful mural on the wall is pretty cool too. Click on the link above and watch the video on their website, looks like fun doesn’t it?

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Motor City Wine isn’t exactly a new business but it is a nice way to end the day. Part wine shop, part wine bar, live Jazz, DJ’s and a patio make MCW a popular place to hang out. The unassuming exterior gives way to a long bar, surprisingly busy; corks decorate the wall behind the back bar. A hand-written menu tells you today’s selections. In addition to wine they have a pretty good beer list and spirits. Hungry? Snack on Marcona almonds, potato chips, olives or how about a cheese or charcuterie plate? Kris and I order sangria’s at the bar, tables are laid out near the u-shaped retail section, we have this area to ourselves. I sip my sangria as I browse the wine selection from all over the world. You can purchase a bottle and drink it here for an $8 corkage fee. Our glasses are empty, must be time to go home. 

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Cranbrook: Artiful…

13 May

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Cranbrook Academy of Art is known as the ‘cradle of American modernism’. In 1904 George and Ellen Booth purchased more than 300 acres of land that would eventually become Cranbrook. George Booth, newspaper baron and philanthropist, dreamed of creating a cultural institution on the property. He envisioned Cranbrook Academy as a place where students learned under the guidance of masters in their field. Eliel Saarinen was brought in to oversee the architectural and landscape development of the campus; the environment he created is one-of-a-kind. The campus is a National Historic Landmark, considered the most complete example of Saarinen’s genius, it is a treasure of architecture and horticulture. The original structures were built from the late 1920’s through 1942. Once a year Cranbrook hosts Open (Studios), today the studio doors are open to the public, we are free to wander in and out of places ordinarily off limits. Students will be on hand to answer questions, their work is on display and in many cases for sale. Let’s get started.

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We begin our journey at the Cranbrook Museum of Art (1942), water sprays skyward from Carl Milles Orpheus fountain, water ripples with sunlight in the shallow pool. Inside the museum visitors fill the galleries; Open Studios includes free admission to the art and science museums. I tend to meander in art museums, I let my eyes be my guide; from the colorful lucite display to the metal wall sculpture to the art of projected images I travel this way and that way. I enjoy the photographic light boxes, whimsical paintings and giant canvases, I find architectural models fascinating. On the lower level we check out Stephen Frykholm’s Essence Of Summer posters for the annual Herman Miller Picnic. They truly capture the essence of summer; fruits, vegetables, popsicles, red-checked tablecloths, sunny days; I bet the picnics were quite the shindig. When we finish both museum floors we head out to the studios.

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The Cranbrook Academy of Art is an independent, graduate degree-granting institution offering an intense studio-based experience where 10 artists-in-residence mentor 150 graduate students for a full-time 2-year studio-based study–no classes, no grades. At the end of the 2-year period students prepare a written Masters Statement and exhibit their work in the Graduate Degree Exhibition at Cranbrook Art Museum. Individual studios, shared spaces, production facilities, critique rooms, social areas and kitchens create a unique peer-to-peer community. Let’s start in the painting studio. Interiors are stark white, providing zero distraction from the art on display; from realism to abstract, small to large, multi-hued to monotone the work is amazing. Kris speaks to one artist about her work, she has taken old photographs and turned them into paintings, specifically focusing on one character in the scene, creating a whole new perspective. Katherine Adkins pieces are intriguing; bold colors and designs, funky shapes and textures, bumpy, puffy, shiny, I want to reach out and touch them.

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Here’s what I’m going to do. Kris has taken plenty of photos,  I’ll take you on a walk through studios and campus and let the photographs speak for themselves; not to mention I can’t remember which pieces are where… The next building over is the sculpture studios. Artists strike up conversations, visitors eagerly participate; we are literally surrounded by art. We are as captivated by the architecture as we are the art. Leaded glass windows open to grassy squares or courtyards, thoughtfully placed buildings form connections from one to the other. A cool spring breeze drifts in, natural light floods the space. Up stairs, down stairs, narrow halls, each turn rewarding us with another spectacular view or the outstanding creativity of artists.

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We make our way to 2D, 3D and Print studios, always glad to escape to the outdoor, enchanted kingdom that is Cranbrook. Formal courtyards, brick walkways, ornamental gates, porticos, brick and stone arches. We move from one place to another going from a closed space to an open space, from a narrow tunnel to a wide expanse. We follow arrows and signs from on building to the next, in a basement studio artists are happy to see we found our way to their space, I love the piece on the floor, it looks like a glittery land fairies would like to live. Large windows, artist sinks and storage spaces are a constant reminder these buildings were intentionally created for artists. The Academy of Art was officially sanctioned in 1932 with Eliel Saarinen as President. The artists who lived and worked inside these walls truly changed the design world; Carl Milles, Eero Saarinen, Ray and Charles Eames, Florence Knoll, Harry Bertoia, Marshall Fredericks, Jack Lenor Larsen, Niels Diffrient, Duane Hanson, Nick Cave, just to name a few. Some of the greatest design talents the United States has had in modern times lived here, worked here.

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The Print Media studios are closer to Lone Pine Rd, I enjoy seeing the personal side of the artists in the way they decorate their space; the Desk-O-Matic emblem is super-cool. Water colors, mixed media pieces, each telling a story, sending a message. Cabinets and drawers hold a stockpile of supplies. A group of students has moved outside to drink in the long-awaited spring air; student works are displayed on sidewalks. The Architecture studio is a good distance from where we are, we enjoy the stunning landscape as we walk. The space is somewhat garage-like, concrete floors and huge open spaces, large lights hang above work spaces. Tree stumps rest on the floor, wooden legs and table tops are on display. The Hangar Photo building is really crowded, Kris and I both like photography.

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We walk across campus paying careful attention to architectural details, even the doors are gorgeous. We pause at the Triton pool, I could look at it for hours, Kris photographs it from all angles. New Studios (2002) includes Metalsmithing, Ceramics and Fiber, it’s the last building on our list. Ceramics are my favorite, students create everything from utility items to decorative pieces. One artist has a lovely selection of bowls and cups decorated with an airbrushing of blue, another has a variety of figurines and faces that make me wonder what they’re thinking. It’s getting warmer as we walk, we’re in the area where they fire the pieces; kilns range in size and shape from floor-models to walk-ins. It’s too warm here. I have a soft spot for the stuffed animals often found in Fiber departments, these are quite hugable. We end with the metalsmithing floor, it’s a wonder what they can do with metal.

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We are having a late lunch at Market North End on a quiet section of Old Woodward. We have been by here so many times and never knew what the restaurant was called, the only visible signage is for the ABOOD Law Firm. There are open tables on the screened-in-patio, it feels good to sit. The hostess recommends their pizza, who am I to argue? Ice cold glasses of water hit the spot as we wait for the food– which doesn’t take long. The Market Chopped Salad comes out first; chopped tomato, cucumber, radishes, onion, jalapeno, radicchio, tossed with a little lemon juice and evoo. I like that everything is chopped the same size, it’s so fresh, delicious. The Quattaro pizza has a white sauce topped with ham, caramelized onion and cracked egg. I cut up the egg and evenly distribute it among the slices. We eat at remarkable speed, when finished there isn’t a crumb left. This is the first time we’ve had an egg on our pizza and I have to say it is quite good.

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It has been a remarkable day, going to a place we know so well yet seeing an entirely new side. George Booth hoped to create something of lasting value and significance, a place that would elevate the lives of those near there, those who lived there, visited there; I say he succeeded beautifully.