Tag Archives: art

PORT HURON: I Cover the Waterfront

5 Jun

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It’s hot! When Mother Nature turns up the heat Port Huron is a great escape. Known as the Maritime Capital of the Great Lakes, Port Huron offers waterfront parks, beaches, a river walk and breathtaking views of Lake Huron on 7 miles of shoreline. We drive straight to the Thomas Edison Parkway, this is where the St. Clair River and Lake Huron meet, the iconic Blue Water Bridge provides a spectacular backdrop for photos as it connects the United States to Canada. We park the car and begin our walk toward the bridge; it’s a gorgeous, sunny day, a cool breeze blows in from the lake. Fishermen have baited their poles and locked them into place, a bell will signal them if there’s activity on the line, a net is kept close by in anticipation of catching a big one. We pass the lightship Huron, once a floating lighthouse, now a museum ship. Power boats wearing fancy paint jobs zip by at speed, there’s some pretty big ones out here today. The girls on the Jet Ski look like they’re having a blast. 

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Signs are posted here and there along the riverwalk filling us in on interesting facts about the area. Did you know Port Huron is located at the 43rd Parallel? That means when I am standing here I am actually closer to the Equator than I am the North Pole. Thomas Edison moved to Port Huron with his family when he was 7 in 1854, the St. Clair River is 39 miles long, oh, and the water that flows through the Great Lakes ends up in the Atlantic Ocean. You can also read about native fish, shipwrecks and sacred grounds. A Coast Guard boat is keeping an eye on all of the activity, a diver down flag bobbing on the river’s surface tells us a scuba diver is looking for sunken treasures below. A train moves slowly down the waterfront track, I bet it just came from the Domtar paper mill. The anchor is from the John S Martin which sank in 1900. A monument dedicated in remembrance of the Great Storm of 1913 stands on the other side of the train tracks; 19 ships and 250 lives were lost in the storm, an additional 50 ships were damaged. On the north end of the parkway is my favorite statue, the Blue Water Maiden, she was moved here in 2010 and greets all who travel the waterway.

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The Midwest Sculpture Initiative (MSI) has put together a sculpture exhibition along the riverwalk for the last 3 years. Ken Thompson, an artist and sculptor himself, formed MSI to provide innovative exhibitions that feature outdoor sculpture throughout the midwest. Let’s take a look. I stand in one place and look out over the open-space gallery, bright colors, geometric shapes,rusty, shiny, large forms and goats fill my sight. In no particular order Kris and I traverse the landscape to see each piece. 6 metal forms are grouped together to form Old Orchard, I think they’re apple trees. Crescent Song has a coyote howling at the moon, I follow the sound of wind chimes to Madame Butterfly, look at all the butterflies gathered around her head, she looks happy.

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Each sculpture has a plaque with the name of the piece, the name of the artist and the price, some names are obvious; Curves, Falling Pyramids, R&B. I like the colors of Red Green Construction, I totally follow the yellow bounce of bouncing ball. A close look at the goats reveals found objects integrated into the sculpture; chains, wrenches, a hood hinge, what do you see? Icarus is a complex piece, a figure hangs by delicate fingers from a bar, unattached wings to the sides, the expression somber. There’s a horse on a rainbow and a whimsical figure named Daphne who has a tree growing from the top of her head, I bet the kids love to play on the Morning Glory Whisper Bench II. If you like sculpture be sure to check out MSI’s website to see other exhibitions in the midwest. If you’re looking for more Michigan art, check out the MI Amazing Art Tour app, available for iPhone and android. 

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We’re having lunch downtown at the Port Huron Office Center building. Rix’s Roof Top restaurant owned and operated by a local family, is located on the 6th floor, this is actually the old Fog Cutter space, ring a bell? The elevator takes us to the top floor, the dining room is surrounded in glass, chandeliers of electric candles glow dimly, ceiling panels are black, the floor is dark, the decor is the panoramic view outside the windows. We’ve arrived during Happy Hour, well drinks are just $2. When the cocktails arrive we place our order, we watch freighters pass while eating warm bread slathered in butter. The burger and steak bites arrive together as we requested, the food is good; steak bites are tender, burger is prepared well. The service was great and the view unbeatable.

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The Exquisite Corpse Coffee House opened in 2012, last December new owners Maggie and Nathaniel took over and have really made the place their own. The space is beautiful, warm, welcoming, the coffee is excellent; they have added baked goods, light sandwiches and bagels to the menu. Art is still in the front part of the space, works are by local artists, a counter in the front window allows patrons a glimpse of the goings-on outside. Choose a seat at the large community table or relax in a comfy chair, play one of the many available board games with friends.

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There’s always something going on in the coffee shop these days; ballroom dancing lessons, yoga, magic shows, music and hypnosis demonstrations.  We’re here for the coffee and the company. We drink our cold brews as we catch up on the latest Port Huron news; they’re making progress on the new City Flats hotel, new businesses are coming soon, Boat Night is July 13, the Port Huron to Mackinac Race is July 14, the International Boat Show is September 14-15. We prefer coming on just an ordinary day, the water is always blue, the breeze is cool, the food is good and the people are friendly.

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Cranbrook: Artiful…

13 May

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Cranbrook Academy of Art is known as the ‘cradle of American modernism’. In 1904 George and Ellen Booth purchased more than 300 acres of land that would eventually become Cranbrook. George Booth, newspaper baron and philanthropist, dreamed of creating a cultural institution on the property. He envisioned Cranbrook Academy as a place where students learned under the guidance of masters in their field. Eliel Saarinen was brought in to oversee the architectural and landscape development of the campus; the environment he created is one-of-a-kind. The campus is a National Historic Landmark, considered the most complete example of Saarinen’s genius, it is a treasure of architecture and horticulture. The original structures were built from the late 1920’s through 1942. Once a year Cranbrook hosts Open (Studios), today the studio doors are open to the public, we are free to wander in and out of places ordinarily off limits. Students will be on hand to answer questions, their work is on display and in many cases for sale. Let’s get started.

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We begin our journey at the Cranbrook Museum of Art (1942), water sprays skyward from Carl Milles Orpheus fountain, water ripples with sunlight in the shallow pool. Inside the museum visitors fill the galleries; Open Studios includes free admission to the art and science museums. I tend to meander in art museums, I let my eyes be my guide; from the colorful lucite display to the metal wall sculpture to the art of projected images I travel this way and that way. I enjoy the photographic light boxes, whimsical paintings and giant canvases, I find architectural models fascinating. On the lower level we check out Stephen Frykholm’s Essence Of Summer posters for the annual Herman Miller Picnic. They truly capture the essence of summer; fruits, vegetables, popsicles, red-checked tablecloths, sunny days; I bet the picnics were quite the shindig. When we finish both museum floors we head out to the studios.

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The Cranbrook Academy of Art is an independent, graduate degree-granting institution offering an intense studio-based experience where 10 artists-in-residence mentor 150 graduate students for a full-time 2-year studio-based study–no classes, no grades. At the end of the 2-year period students prepare a written Masters Statement and exhibit their work in the Graduate Degree Exhibition at Cranbrook Art Museum. Individual studios, shared spaces, production facilities, critique rooms, social areas and kitchens create a unique peer-to-peer community. Let’s start in the painting studio. Interiors are stark white, providing zero distraction from the art on display; from realism to abstract, small to large, multi-hued to monotone the work is amazing. Kris speaks to one artist about her work, she has taken old photographs and turned them into paintings, specifically focusing on one character in the scene, creating a whole new perspective. Katherine Adkins pieces are intriguing; bold colors and designs, funky shapes and textures, bumpy, puffy, shiny, I want to reach out and touch them.

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Here’s what I’m going to do. Kris has taken plenty of photos,  I’ll take you on a walk through studios and campus and let the photographs speak for themselves; not to mention I can’t remember which pieces are where… The next building over is the sculpture studios. Artists strike up conversations, visitors eagerly participate; we are literally surrounded by art. We are as captivated by the architecture as we are the art. Leaded glass windows open to grassy squares or courtyards, thoughtfully placed buildings form connections from one to the other. A cool spring breeze drifts in, natural light floods the space. Up stairs, down stairs, narrow halls, each turn rewarding us with another spectacular view or the outstanding creativity of artists.

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We make our way to 2D, 3D and Print studios, always glad to escape to the outdoor, enchanted kingdom that is Cranbrook. Formal courtyards, brick walkways, ornamental gates, porticos, brick and stone arches. We move from one place to another going from a closed space to an open space, from a narrow tunnel to a wide expanse. We follow arrows and signs from on building to the next, in a basement studio artists are happy to see we found our way to their space, I love the piece on the floor, it looks like a glittery land fairies would like to live. Large windows, artist sinks and storage spaces are a constant reminder these buildings were intentionally created for artists. The Academy of Art was officially sanctioned in 1932 with Eliel Saarinen as President. The artists who lived and worked inside these walls truly changed the design world; Carl Milles, Eero Saarinen, Ray and Charles Eames, Florence Knoll, Harry Bertoia, Marshall Fredericks, Jack Lenor Larsen, Niels Diffrient, Duane Hanson, Nick Cave, just to name a few. Some of the greatest design talents the United States has had in modern times lived here, worked here.

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The Print Media studios are closer to Lone Pine Rd, I enjoy seeing the personal side of the artists in the way they decorate their space; the Desk-O-Matic emblem is super-cool. Water colors, mixed media pieces, each telling a story, sending a message. Cabinets and drawers hold a stockpile of supplies. A group of students has moved outside to drink in the long-awaited spring air; student works are displayed on sidewalks. The Architecture studio is a good distance from where we are, we enjoy the stunning landscape as we walk. The space is somewhat garage-like, concrete floors and huge open spaces, large lights hang above work spaces. Tree stumps rest on the floor, wooden legs and table tops are on display. The Hangar Photo building is really crowded, Kris and I both like photography.

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We walk across campus paying careful attention to architectural details, even the doors are gorgeous. We pause at the Triton pool, I could look at it for hours, Kris photographs it from all angles. New Studios (2002) includes Metalsmithing, Ceramics and Fiber, it’s the last building on our list. Ceramics are my favorite, students create everything from utility items to decorative pieces. One artist has a lovely selection of bowls and cups decorated with an airbrushing of blue, another has a variety of figurines and faces that make me wonder what they’re thinking. It’s getting warmer as we walk, we’re in the area where they fire the pieces; kilns range in size and shape from floor-models to walk-ins. It’s too warm here. I have a soft spot for the stuffed animals often found in Fiber departments, these are quite hugable. We end with the metalsmithing floor, it’s a wonder what they can do with metal.

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We are having a late lunch at Market North End on a quiet section of Old Woodward. We have been by here so many times and never knew what the restaurant was called, the only visible signage is for the ABOOD Law Firm. There are open tables on the screened-in-patio, it feels good to sit. The hostess recommends their pizza, who am I to argue? Ice cold glasses of water hit the spot as we wait for the food– which doesn’t take long. The Market Chopped Salad comes out first; chopped tomato, cucumber, radishes, onion, jalapeno, radicchio, tossed with a little lemon juice and evoo. I like that everything is chopped the same size, it’s so fresh, delicious. The Quattaro pizza has a white sauce topped with ham, caramelized onion and cracked egg. I cut up the egg and evenly distribute it among the slices. We eat at remarkable speed, when finished there isn’t a crumb left. This is the first time we’ve had an egg on our pizza and I have to say it is quite good.

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It has been a remarkable day, going to a place we know so well yet seeing an entirely new side. George Booth hoped to create something of lasting value and significance, a place that would elevate the lives of those near there, those who lived there, visited there; I say he succeeded beautifully.

Columbus: Art See…

16 Apr

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Our visit to Ohio’s capital city continues with the Columbus Museum of Art. The Neo Classical  building opened in January of 1931, there have been several expansions through the years, the latest, 50,000 sq. ft. that includes a new wing, atrium and cafe. That said, if you’re expecting the DIA, you’ll be disappointed, this museum is not of that stature. The collection includes late 19th and early 20th century American and European modern works of art. The museum holds the world’s largest collection of works by Columbus artists Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson, Elijah Pierce and George Bellows. Contemporary Art, Folk Art, glass, photography, expressionist works and social commentary art can all be found within its walls. 

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We park in the lot adjacent to the building, it’s nice outside so we take some time to explore the grounds. A new garden courtyard provides seating with a nice view of the surrounding area; sculptures are made of stainless steel and wire, painted steel, aluminum and bronze. I’m not sure why but the tall metal strips in red, white and blue remind me of bacon–I must be hungry. The new wing has a limestone base, the rectangular-shaped gallery space is covered in panels of green-patinated copper with deep-set floor to ceiling windows, very modern looking. We use the north entrance stepping into the natural-light-infused atrium. I can see straight through to the front of the museum, lounge areas look inviting, directly above, 35 glass boats dangle, catching the light. We take the stairs to the second floor, small rooms contain video and projection installations. Large, modern works of art hang on stark white walls, individual wood planks lay side by side, it makes me think of fettuccine (why does everything remind me of food?). ‘Back of Kelly’ is a startling life-like recreation of the back of a man, I like the Nocturne Navigator, the skirt of the dress looks like stars in the night sky.

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The original building remains opulent; fancy metal grates act as windows, elegant light fixtures hang from decoratively painted ceilings. Dale Chihuly’s glass art always commands attention. Here the walls are soft colors; vanilla, lavender, blue. Wood floors creak beneath our feet, we traverse long halls, duck in and out of galleries viewing pieces by Charles Demuth, Francis Criss, Clarence Holbrook Carter, Niles Spencer and Norman Rockwell’s Morning After The Wedding. A giant sunflower under glass glows in the center of a gallery, it’s beautiful. We are delighted by the works of Renoir, Monet, Picasso, Matisse, Cezanne, Degas, Juan Gris and Diego Rivera. Some spaces have seating, allowing you to relax and really absorb the art. In the hall terrazzo floors gleam, different kinds of glass are displayed in cubicles.

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On the bottom floor there’s a whole section designed to get visitors creatively involved. A black wall is covered in art made from Post-it notes, it’s amazing what some people have made from sticky squares of paper. The Wonder Room is awesome; duck under draped pieces of cloth to a burgundy-painted room with a blanket fort, a giant spider web made from vintage textiles complete with super-sized bugs and a fashion station where you can create garments for a dress form. It’s a pretty cool space, great works of art hang on the walls as inspiration, tables are filled with materials for you to create your own great work of art, kids and adults seem to be enjoying the experience equally.We find ourselves at the original entrance, to me this is the prettiest part, architecturally speaking. The ceiling is amazing; blue, cream, yellow, green and gold all working together to create lovely patterns. The chandelier hangs from a central panel, potted palms sprout from urns, marble steps, brass railings and archways  foreshadow the treasures on display inside.

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 We’re headed over to a warehouse called 400 West Rich in Franklinton; Heather at the Terra Art Gallery  in Dublin recommended we check it out. Franklinton was the first American settlement in Franklin County, founded in 1797, it was annexed to the city of Columbus in 1870. Much of the land lies below the level of the Scioto and Olentangy Rivers, floods have taken their toll through the centuries. With a new flood wall in place the area is no longer considered a floodplain, making this district just west of downtown ripe for redevelopment.  400 West Rich resides in a warehouse built in 1910 by D.A. Ebinger Sanitary Manufacturing Company, this sanitary porcelain manufacturer invented the public drinking fountain as we know it. EBCO left the building in the 1950’s, a series of interesting tenants followed; Sweden Freezer, Taco Bell, Pizza Hut and Eickholt Glass. Today it’s a combination of artists studios, galleries and Strongwater Food and Spirits; let’s go in. A grin creeps across my face when we step inside, this was the lobby the EBCO warehouse, the terrazzo floor is spectacular, I don’t think I’ve ever seen such an intricate pattern before. The furniture is pure mid-century, love the colors. Look at the old receptionist’s desk, how about that rotary phone? Up a few steps we are in the bar and dining space, they’ve even turned former offices into little dining rooms. 

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We chat with our server about the building, Franklinton and Columbus in general, he points out the mural of Grace Darling, she was a media celebrity in 1838. She and her father were responsible for rescuing shipwrecked sailors from the SS Forfarshire. With a little help from our server we make our selections and in no time lunch is served; everything looks delicious. The Farro salad is excellent, the grain is tender, radishes and cukes are crisp, peas, sweet drop peppers and sprouts add sweetness, the soy sauce vinaigrette adds the perfect amount of saltiness. The Nashville Hot Chicken Sandwich stacks pickles, arugula, red hot aiolo on top of a spicy chicken breast all held together with a brioche bun. It has a nice kick and excellent flavor, the red hot is not the overwhelming flavor. Before we leave we take a peek at the event spaces, the original sawtooth windows are now used in the ceiling. Original birch wood has been repurposed into tables and the bar. Here and there leftover machinery, tools and bolts lurk about. What a great way to re-use and old warehouse.

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As we drive around the district a little we see a sign for Glass Axis, oh good, they’re open. The building is another left-over from like 1902, it’s now used as a glass-making facility. The non-profit allows the public access to well-equipped studios for all forms of glass art including stained and fused glass, torch and hot glass blowing and sculpting and neon art. They offer hands-on classes, demonstrations, public programs and even event space. A student removes his rod from the furnace, we watch in fascination as he gently blows into one end and a glass piece begins to take form at the other end. It’s really warm standing by the furnace, at least 6 other rods are warming up. We walk past bowls of glass chips, kilns, huge gloves work tables and a variety of other glass-related tools and equipment. At the back we wander into the gallery, shelves and pedestals hold glass in a variety of colors and forms. Vases, bowls, garden stakes and unique light boxes capture our attention; many of the items are for sale. I’m glad we were able to stop in. I imagine the next time we visit there will be a dozen new businesses here in Franklinton. Time to bid Columbus farewell; thanks, it’s been fun!

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Time to go to Cleveland…

18 Feb

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In late December we packed a few bags and pointed the car toward Cleveland. The city is full of good restaurants, great architecture and fun things to do. Instead of  heading directly to the 216 we stopped in at the Liberty Aviation Museum in Port Clinton OH. Established in 1991 to showcase WWII aircraft, the museum is located on the grounds of the Erie-Ottawa International Airport. We enter off of State Rd, the complex is huge, parking is easy. The lobby gives way to Gallery 1, Civilian Aviation, display cases and glass shelves display aviation items and National Air Race memorabilia; I’m not really into planes so I’m not sure what I’m looking at. I walk around looking at displays and reading signs, suddenly I find myself fascinated. We are near the Lake Erie Islands, you’ve probably heard of, if not been to, Put-In-Bay, I guess I never really thought about it but airplanes were an important form of all-season travel between the islands and t0/from the mainland. An old billboard reads “Fly Island Airlines” on the famous Tri-Motor, hhmm, what is this Tri-Motor? 

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The Ford Tri-Motor is an American 3-engine transport aircraft brought to the world by Henry and Edsel Ford, production started in 1925 and ended in 1933, 199 were made, it was nicknamed The Tin Goose. Henry Ford brought us the first paved runway, the first passenger terminal, hangar, airmail and radio navigation. Over 100 airlines flew the Tri-Motor, the design was superior to other airliners providing comfortable passenger service, safety and reliability. It spurred the first coast-to-coast flight by Transcontinental Air Transport (later TWA), in 1927 a Ford Tri-Motor was used for flight from Key West to Havana Cuba. Locally the Tri-Motor was a familiar sight over Lake Erie, it hauled passengers and freight, was used as an ambulance, school bus, hearse and mail plane. The plane had the capability to take off and land on short runways like the ones on the islands. Tri-Motors were used by second and third-tier airlines well into the 1960’s, I read some are still in use today.We continue through the gallery looking at black and white photos, TWA uniforms, models of planes and steamships; we watch a short film about Lake Erie ice fishing. Tables are being set up in Hangar 1 for an upcoming special event, we pop in for just a minute to check out the red plane, a silver 57 Chevy and an beautiful green Chrysler.

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It’s a short walk out the back door to the next building into Hangar 2, here we find a bevy of military vehicles; tanks, Jeeps, motorbikes and planes. Information and photos accompany most displays, there’s a lot to take in. A Grumman TBM 3E Avenger and a North American Harvard IV look small in the vast space. A vintage B-25 airplane named Georgie’s Girl features a beautiful woman with a halo (scantily) dressed in white, this would be Angela, the other side belongs to Helena, in red, with horns and a tail–cute. Another section of the building is dedicated for restoration, there’s a lot of it going on. We get a guided tour of the area, the big project is the PT 728 WWII boat. Sitting disassembled on jacks and cinder blocks there’s much work to be done, pieces are scattered about, new engines are covered, waiting to be installed. When finished, the hope is to be able to take tourists out in it. The museum is also home to the Tri-Motor Heritage Foundation and the Tin Goose Diner, a 1949 diner out of Elizabeth NJ.

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We’re off to the Cleveland Museum of Art, one of the world’s most distinguished comprehensive art museums and one of our favorites. Our DIA membership gets us into the special exhibition The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920’s for free. This is the first major museum exhibition to focus on American taste and art during the 1920’s and 30’s. I love this time in American history, think about it, WWI had ended and we won, confidence was high, money was flowing, women earned the right to vote, European designers came to America, American artists studied and traveled abroad, social mores were redefined. It created a culture of elegance, glamour, decadence, extravagance; it was an era of change and contrast, and it was oh, so beautiful!  

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Look at these pictures; vibrant colors, streamlined designs, sumptuous materials. Cleveland’s own Rose Iron Works created the stunning Muse With Violin Screen, made of wrought iron, brass, silver and gold plating it’s a real eye catcher. The jewelry is to-die-for, dazzling diamonds, emeralds, pearls, much of it Art Deco in design. One look and you know what period the furniture is from, great lines, not necessarily comfortable. I recognize the white chair with the striped fabric, it’s on loan from the DIA, the super-cool green desk and chair were manufactured in Grand Rapids MI. Extravagant clocks and watches, amazing silver tea service sets, coffee servers, candle holders. Check out the massive chandelier, it’s incredible, opulent, all of that crystal, it reminds me of a fountain, it was made for the 1928 International Exposition of Art and Industry, as were many of the items in the exhibition.

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Attention to detail was really important, everything was pretty; perfume bottles, mirrors, hair brushes. The trophy for a 1923 ice skating competition is made of rock crystal to look like frozen water, silver, lapis lzuli and marble. Moving on to fashion, there’s a lovely display of dresses, think ‘flapper’; fringe, rhinestones, multi-levels, scalloped hems. Gone were tight fitting waistlines; women threw away their corsets and opted for a loose fit, they bobbed their hair, smoked cigarettes and danced. Automobiles followed fashion and design, the red 1937 Cord is a perfect example of streamlined design. I’m hoping the exhibit will travel to Detroit, I’d love to see it again.

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Every time we get to Cleveland there’s something new on Lorain Ave, tonight we’re having dinner at Xinji Noodle Bar. Located in a 2-story brick building the decor is industrial and playful. The brief menu is filled with Asian and Korean favorites, I sip on hot green tea waiting for our dinner to arrive. The Vegetarian Ramen is mushroom broth with a variety of mushrooms, Napa choy and of course, noodles, it’s soooo good! The Korean Fried Chicken Bao is outstanding; white chicken, sweet and spicy chili, pickle and Taiwanese cabbage, I think I could eat another. The Spicy Pork Dumplings came highly recommended, I can see why, they’re delicious. Another great find!

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Having a nightcap at Stone Mad Pub has become a Cleveland tradition for us. The place is charming; lots of wood, not too loud, a fireplace and great service. We hang out at the bar people-watching, chatting with the bartenders; Kris enjoys his whiskey, I’m having Bailey’s, my idea of dessert. It feels good to relax, to escape the real world, even if it’s only for a little while. 

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Detroit: Alive & Noel…

13 Dec

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Tonight we’re just wandering around Detroit; we’ll dip our toe into Noel Night, visit the downtown Holiday Markets and finish up with dinner and drinks in Southwest. All of the featured places are new to Detroit’s growing list of places to eat, drink and shop. Let’s begin with Noel Night, being seasoned veterans of this event we tend to steer clear of  the crowds at larger venues such as the DIA, Library, Science Center and the like. Instead we head over to Third Street, the Detroit Design Center has a sculpture park next to the building, one-of-a-kind pieces decorate the open space, flood lights illuminate the art casting funky shadows on the wall. Tonight the building is open to the public, artists are busy putting on the finishing touches. Huge carbon steel sculptures reach toward the ceiling,  metal statement pieces are grounded to the floor, I’m crazy about the swing. Pieces are made of glass, metal and wood, you can purchase art for a wall, a tabletop or desk; the metal skyline organizer would look great on my counter.

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In 1949 the Willis Show Bar opened on the corner of Willis and Third Street, it was an entertainment hot spot featuring live Jazz. As the area declined so did the clientele; the building was closed down and padlocked in 1978. Today the building wears a fresh coat of paint, the Art Moderne exterior shines, a sign painted on the Willis side of the building announces the re-opening of this memorable venue. The Detroit Optimist Society and a group of L.A. investors plan a January 2018 re-opening, the 75-seat bar will serve 1960’s inspired cocktails and bar snacks, the stage will host live Jazz, Blues and Soul artists cabaret style. I can hardly wait!

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Does anybody remember the Hammer and Nail building on Woodward? This 12-story Mid-Century building was built in 1965, the hammer and nail was originally intended as a tribute to a local carpenter’s union. The building, now called The Plaza, recently underwent a complete restoration and is now home to 72 apartments. As part of the Noel Night festivities the building is open for tours, let’s take a look. A lovely Christmas tree adorns the lobby, through a glass doorway the neon hammer and nail have found a new resting spot on an interior wall, we are told this space will be a public bar in the future, it’s fun to see this landmark lit up again. A tour guide loads 5 of us into an elevator stopping on the 10th floor, we are seeing a 1-bedroom corner unit. From the dimly lit entrance we follow a short hall past the laundry room into the living space, one left turn and we’re looking out a wall of windows at the Detroit skyline. Everybody stops in their tracks, our host has not turned on any lights, giving us a clear look at the spectacular view, each of us gravitates toward the windows; Ford Field glows in Christmas colors to the left, Little Caesars Arena to the right, the Ambassador Bridge further in the distance–wow! We see pedestrians crowding the sidewalk on Woodward, the towers of the Renaissance Center are red, I can see Motor City Casino too. 

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Next we drive over to Capitol Park for the holiday markets; from now until January 7 a series of pop-up businesses will fill the park. At first I don’t even know where I am, I mean, I know the surrounding buildings, but the outdoor space has been completely transformed. Local shops fill terrarium-like little glass booths; you can purchase art, a toboggan, a wreath or even a fresh-cut Christmas tree. The air smells of evergreens and food, deck chairs surround a log table, people are making s’mores at the fire pit, visitors are packed into Eatori’s booth drinking cocktails by the Christmas tree. White lights are strung everywhere, zig-zagging above public spaces. We walk down State Street to Woodward and find trees tightly wrapped in miniature lights, fresh landscaping includes garlands and branches spray painted in red and white, it’s a winter wonderland.

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Campus Maritus is buzzing with activity, ice skaters fill the rink, the Christmas tree is the prettiest one yet, the line to rent skates is long, with hot chocolates in hand, nobody seems to mind. We cross over to Cadillac Square, picnic tables, deck chairs and fire pits fill the space between to long rows of glass booths. Food trucks, Detroit City Nut Company, fudge and popcorn are available to hungry spectators. The Cadillac Bier Garten is a good place to rest and take in the city, and have a beer of course. At the far end a large tent has been transformed into a Lodge; couches, comfy chairs, blankets and rugs welcome chilly pedestrians. Chandeliers are made of branches, strings of white lights make the tent festive. People are waiting in line to get in, we take a peek inside then continue walking. 

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The Woodward Esplande is gorgeous; the concrete pathway leads us though grapevine arches, surrounding landscape is lit with spotlights and miniature lights, people are taking advantage of the many photo ops along the way. The pathway opens up, here LED lights are strung above us, colors rotate from one shade to the next, it’s stunning, I feel like I’m in a Hallmark Christmas movie. The One Woodward building is decked out for the holidays; a tall, slender tree, elegant in white stands on one side of the lobby while a trio of gold and white ornaments anchors the other side. Standing at this level we overlook the Spirit of Detroit Plaza, clear igloos offer passersby food and drink, while large blocks make up an ice-cube maze; we need to get a closer look. This is amazing! In one igloo we find ping-pong and air hockey tables, another sells goodies from Good Cakes and Bakes, how about a cup of coffee from New Order? Unfortunately we’re here after most of the shops have closed for the evening. Families giggle as they make their way through the ice-cube maze, again everything lights up and changes colors, I swear the Spirit of Detroit is smiling…

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How does pizza sound? PizzaPlex opened a few short months ago on W Vernor in Southwest Detroit. It’s more than just another pizza joint, there’s a strong sense of community here from the employees to the events that take place in the adjoining space. The pizza oven came straight from Napoli, a pizza cooks in just 90 seconds, that’s good news for us, we’re starving. I order at the counter, #17, the Nikolette is a combo of fresh mozzarella, porcini mushrooms, roasted poblanos, parmigiano, basil and olive oil. I add a house salad and a pour-over coffee. In addition to tasty food, offerings also include coffee drinks and a limited selection bar. Sitting in a booth we are awash in blue LED light, basil grows on shelves mounted to the wall, a movie plays on the screen in the community room. Our food is brought to the table; the pizza is delicious, the crust the perfect amount of crisp and chewy, a nice balance of toppings, we eat the whole thing…

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Just down the street the Detroit Optimist Society has opened a Tiki-themed bar called Mutiny. Inside, the casual space has all the thing we’ve come to expect from a tiki bar; Hawiian-shirt wearing bar tenders, bamboo, the ceiling a mass of colored lights, netting, high-back wicker chairs, large paper umbrellas, thatch, framed vintage menus from high-profile bars back in the day, you get the picture. Tiki mugs and interesting serving glasses line the back bar, check out the photo of the waterfall. The tropical cocktail menu lists all your favorites, with a twist. We order drinks at the bar and watch as the bartender measures shots, shakes concoctions, pours them into specific mugs, he even sets some on fire. Kris’s drink comes in a stemmed coconut glass, mine in a fish mug advertising Plymouth Gin. The drinks are good, the atmosphere laid back; a nice ending to an incredible night.

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Hamtramck Arts Festival

3 Dec

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The Hamtramck Neighborhood Arts Festival is a “loosely curated showcase of artists, writers and musicians living in Hamtramck and surrounding neighborhoods.” Visitors to the festival are invited to walk through downtown Hamtown and the surround streets viewing art or listening to music, in houses, on porches, in backyards, on sidewalks and in storefronts, all for free. We grab our map at Bumbo’s Bar on Holbrook, the place looks pretty cool in a vintage way but it’s packed, I make a mental note to come back on a day when it’s not so crowded. There are 38 little blue dots on the map marking places participating in today’s event, good thing it runs all day.

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We trek over to Klinger, Hamtramck Disneyland Artist-in-Residence Joanie Wind has opened her studio to festival-goers. Inside the compact home her abstract paintings hang near the entryway, I like the textures and glitter. In the family room her video art plays on a large television screen. Outside is the infamous Folk Art installation we all know and love, Hamtramck Disneyland. I’m excited because this is the first time I’ll be seeing it from inside the yard instead of from the alley. For those of you unfamiliar with the story behind the art here’s a little history: Hamtramck Disneyland is the work of artist Dmytro Szylak, it took him nearly 30 years to build it atop the 2 garages on the properties that he owned. It’s a whimsical combination of photographs, posters, found items, that together twirl, spin, illuminate, entertain. It’s Americana, kitsch and Dr. Seuss all strung together from ground to sky. We pass the Statue of Liberty on the porch and take the narrow walkway between 2 houses, crossing under the archway of horses into the backyard. 

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We see the jetliner, a rocking horse and carousel horses for the first time. A windmill turns, a duck flaps its wings, a lumberjack saws.  Real Sparrows and Chickadees are perched throughout the sculpture, not a single one is phased by the pieces dancing in the wind. The longer we look the more we discover; a bicycle rim, window fan, Mickey Mouse, propellers, sailors, miniature lights, missals and a helicopter… In the alley a fresh coat of paint has been applied to the garage and fence. After Szylak’s death residents expressed concern over what would happen to the neighborhood Disneyland, Hatch Art took ownership of the properties in 2016, their plan is to repair and maintain the installation, it’s looking better than it has in a long time. You can see Hamtramck Disneyland for yourself anytime from the alleyway between Sobieski and Klinger, north of Commor, south of Carpenter.

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Speaking of Hatch, let’s go check out their gallery on Evaline. HATCH stands for Hamtramck Art Collective, in 2008 they purchased the old police station from the city and began renovating the building as money allowed; four years later Hatch Art Gallery opened. The 2-story brown-brick building is quietly tucked away on a neighborhood street; exhibitions take up most of the first floor, there’s also classroom space, a gift shop, community dark room and an Art Library where Detroiter’s can borrow a local artists work for their home for up to 2 months. Upstairs, studios are 11 x 14, each has a window, solid door, WiFi and secure 24-hour access, not bad for $200 a month. We climb the stairs and admire the beautiful painting in the hall, wandering in and out of each private studio with an open door we see a variety of mediums and styles; oils, watercolors, portraits, clowns, dogs, plants, sculptures and encaustic pieces. Such a mix of subjects and images; some startling, others serene.

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Moving along we pass an abandoned house where the boarded up windows have become canvases for art. Inside the Ghost Light thick-framed paintings by Emily Jane Wood fill a wall, the band is setting up in the performance space. A house on Caniff has also been turned into studios, I watch as an artist works with dried flowers she grew herself. We notice a small group of people hanging out on a porch, we cross over to see what they’re doing; it’s an interactive display combining sound, art, circuits and sculpture.. Fruits are halved with wires running to a computer, a note instructs me to pick up the wired carrots and use them as drumsticks, how fun is this? Next I tap pumpkins and hard squash with my fingertips, the vegetables have become drums. My favorite thing is the jello cups, I hold the spoon and tap the jiggly concoction mimicking  the sound of a xylophone, each color is a different note, it’s like magic– I could play with this all afternoon!

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A former Chinese restaurant on the corner of Caniff and Jos Campau has been turned into a community space called Bank Suey, today it’s home to an artist market selling everything from homemade samosas to essential oils and fiber art, chair massage anyone? Oloman Cafe is showcasing black and white photography on a gallery wall. I really like the space, so open and airy. Come in for a coffee drink or tea, pastries or light fare, check out the current exhibit, relax in the lounge area; I take my coffee to go.

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The door is open at another multi-level building, we follow the sound of the voices inside. An artist is talking to a group of visitors, we check out his work then ramble through the rest of the building. Upstairs a man is deep in thought, working on a piece. His space is bright, stuff is everywhere, he makes his own material, it looks like some kind of soft plastic, he layers pieces on top of one another creating multi-dimensional works, colors drip and ooze together. His work space is almost as interesting as his work.

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Popps Packing is an artist-­run neighborhood-­based nonprofit organization founded in 2009 by husband and wife artists, Faina Lerman and Graem Whyte. Their mission is to create impactful arts programming and foster cultural exchange between local and international artist communities, while leveraging the unique features of our region, neighborhood, and personal practices.”  Whew, having gotten that about of the way I now want to tell you about Popps Back Forty. Over on Carpenter St. you will notice the house at 2037 is undergoing renovation, we enter carefully, look at the art on display then exit through the back door; what I see is completely unexpected. A wide open space, mature trees, gardens, the tallest corn I’ve ever seen in my life, a treehouse. Stepping out into the yard we wander in amazement, cabbages are still hanging on, Marigolds are finished blooming, a thick layer of mulch separates perennials and vegetables; various garden beds are found throughout the property. Kris climbs the ladder to the treehouse, what a view; I visit the chickens and turkey’s in their pen. Musicians begin arriving for the improvisational soundscape taking place on the back forty; one makes his way to the back of the lot, the boat parked on a trailer will be his stage. Further on more musicians are already making music, one on a large wooden spool another on a platform nestled into a tree. It begins to rain, we listen to ethereal sounds that seem natural in this environment, the tire swing looks lonely, colorful art installations look as if they grew from the ground up; who knew all of this was here?

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Time to eat, the cafe at the Detroit Zen Center is open again, lets get some food. Living Zen Organics, an organic health food store and cafe is located on the lower level of the center. Operated by monks, students and neighbors you can stop in to purchase bulk foods, organic teas or have a bite to eat. The large, open space has an immediate cozy feeling, exposed rafters, glazed brick walls, decorative tiles, wood tables and benches put me at ease. After taking a seat we place our order, I have a sore throat today so director and head cook Myungju Sunim is making me a special tea. I look around at Ball jars filled with dark liquids such as coconut blossom syrup and raw blue agave, others hold spices; turmeric, thyme, sage; metal cans hold dried beans and rice. Back at the table I sip on my tea, it feels good going down. Large plates hold kale salad and a vegan black bean burrito, bowls hold today’s soup. We eat slowly, the calmness dictating our pace, the food is quite flavorful, we enjoy every bite. As a treat Abbot Hwalson Sambul Sunim is making vegan ice cream for the staff, he’s kind enough to share some of it with us, the smooth and creamy banana mixture is sweet and pleasing. What better way to end the day!

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LANSING: Lookin’ Around….

24 Aug

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We’re in the north end of Michigan’s capitol city, Lansing, today the Old Town District is hosting ScrapFest. Here’s how it works; back in June teams had one hour to collect up to 500 lbs of scrap from a local facility, then they have about two weeks to create their sculpture, made entirely of scrap metal. During ScrapFest pieces are displayed and auctioned off, 40% of the proceeds go to the artists, the rest is donated to the Old Town Commercial Association. It’s pretty amazing, check it out…

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The day promises to be a hot one, we arrive just as the festival opens; Turner street has been closed to traffic, artist’s tents line the street, sidewalk cafes are overflowing with diners, metal sculptures of varying heights and widths fill the remainder of the street. My eyes follow the finger of a woman pointing to someone in the distance, I zero in on the man wearing hoof shoes and a metal framed horse head for a hat. There’s so much to look at I find myself wandering with no real purpose or plan. Some sculptures are electrified, a couple of cables and a car battery do the trick. A ‘painting’ sits on an easel, look closely to see the city skyline, a church steeple, the moon and the stars, a second one features a bridge–is that the Mackinac? Kris and I marvel at the towering figure in front of us; with the turn of the wheel his arms, hands and fingers come to life.

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There’s a sculpture of a crane with a scene of cat tails that would look fabulous in my back yard. A large tree is cloaked in lovely metal flowers, there’s a piece that reminds me of antique Tiffany lamps; green glass and metal form a beautiful canopy of leaves. Each sculpture is unique, so creative, it’s hard to believe the components came from a scrap pile. The angel is getting a lot of attention,her stainless steel feathered wings are magnificent. I like the giant mobile-looking piece, do you remember the game Tip-It? That’s what I thought of when I saw it. Lots of people are taking pictures of the robot DJ with his turntables, how about the candle-powered light bulb, the Knight with his chariot, the silhouette of the horse, the gorgeous fire pit, which one would you bid on?

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We pass booths selling mini-sculptures, coasters, key chains, clothing. A line is forming at the food truck, the band is getting ready to play. Kids are making crafts, the street is filling up curious pedestrians. We’re hot and thirsty, Bloom Coffee Roasters is just up the street. Housed in an attractive orange-brick building, the small space serves as a neighborhood gathering spot offering coffee drinks from beans roasted in-house. Folks at the counter are on a first-name basis with the staff, shelves hold bags of freshly roasted beans, mugs and t-shirts. A couple of iced coffees will do the trick for us.

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Back outside the street is jam-packed with people, we make our way from Turner to Grand River on the way back to the car. Kris spots some interesting things through the window of The Gallery In Old Town so we go inside. Turns out the Gallery is an Estate Liquidator, they hold auctions and what they have left they bring to the shop to sell off, at really good prices. This particular lot had a bunch of vintage things; a funky organ, kitchen items from the 40’s and 50’s as well as some pop-style light fixtures. This is a good place to check out from time to time, you never know what you might find. A quick stop on the bridge gives a nice view of the Grand River, a lone fisherman has this part of the river to himself. 

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With art on our minds we drive over to the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum on the campus of Michigan State University. You can’t miss the building; it’s the striking pleated stainless steel and glass building visible from Grand River. Designed by architect Zaha Hadid, her buildings are getting a lot of attention since her death in 2016. The Iraqui-British architect was the first woman to receive the Pritzker Prize, she was the first and only woman to be awarded the Royal Gold Medal from the Royal Institute of British Architects and she was sometimes called the “Queen of the Curve”. I googled her to see her other buildings before I wrote this, she certainly had a way with geometry, I think her buildings are spectacular! The Broad is a parallelogram-shaped building with a distinct  lean, the structure continually changes color depending on the time of day and the angle of the sun. We enter through the west entrance into the Passage Gallery, looking around I am surrounded by curly fries, Kris corrects me, spaghetti, he says. The exhibit is called Toiletpaper Paradise, based on the magazine TOILETPAPER. “Domestic settings are re-imagined as psychedelic, subversive montages vignettes”, I’d say that sums it up. It’s pretty groovy, large pieces hang on the walls, rugs are scattered on the floor; the familiar in an unfamiliar way.

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Around the corner is a big silver tent, a docent leads us inside, a series of red light bulbs illuminate the space, a pulsing rhythm emits from speakers, live crickets chirp in their own rhythm. The docent demonstrates how the crickets will change their chirps as she alters the sound coming from the speakers. We amble through galleries, the next exhibit is The Transported Man, here ordinary objects become not-so-ordinary when you read the additional information about them. A mysterious floating table, a bar of liposuction soap, I like the elephant’s trick, looks like the cat had too much helium…a festival of the odd. We see a wall of windows, each a different color, notable artwork hangs on a cranberry-colored wall. As much as we like contemporary art, the building itself is the main attraction for us. The staircase seems to float, every hallway leads to something unexpected, it’s like an extremely sophisticated fun house.

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Dublin Ohio: Looking In

23 Jul

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Today we’re in Dublin Ohio, a suburb of Columbus located near the west bank of the Scioto River. In the 1800’s, early settlers named the village after their birthplace, Dublin Ireland. For many years Dublin was a sleepy little town, it wasn’t until 1987 after reaching a population of 5,000 residents that it was declared a city. Between the construction of I-270 and major corporate headquarters like Wendy’s and Ashland moving in, the city has grown tremendously. If you’re into golf you probably know Dublin as the location of the Memorial Tournament, a regular stop on the PGA Tour. Jack Nicklaus is from Columbus, he designed the course at The Country Club of Muirfield Village. We’re in the quaint little downtown, “old Dublin”, where Bridge and High Street were once filled with bars and pubs, there was even a stagecoach stop in town. Let’s take a stroll.

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Brick-lined sidewalks take us past 200-year-old buildings standing on tree-lined streets; green plaques identify buildings on the National Register of Historic Places. The architecture is early 19th century, houses are wood-sided and painted in pastel shades of yellow, blue, green, burgundy and white. A tiny stone cottage has red-trimmed windows that match the Geraniums sprouting from window boxes. Hydrangeas are in full bloom, branches sag with the weight of the flowers. It’s the first weekend in July, American flags wave in the breeze, red, white and blue pinwheels are spinning. Stone fences with wrought iron gates stand guard in front elegant homes, sweet potato vines spill from pots crowded with Petunias, Daisies, Begonia and Marigolds.

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Cozy shops are integrated into the neighborhood, Chelsea Borough Home is filled with home goods such as furniture, clocks, vases, candles and accessories; it smells good in here too. An Irish flag hangs outside of Ha’penny Bridge, the shop sells imports of Ireland. I admire elegant crystal and china from Belleek, there are lots of shamrocks, pretty plaids, jewelry, scarves and adorable children’s clothing. We grab a couple of cold brew coffees and a few chocolates at Winans. I notice many of the windows in buildings are still original, I can tell by the waviness of the glass. We stop in the French bakery, La Chatelaine, a glass case holds red, white and blue macaroons. At the intersection of Bridge and High streets we find the Daily Chores sculpture, it was inspired by Dublin’s historic town water pump that sat in the middle of the intersection in the early 1900s. City planners are careful to keep the integrity of Dublin, new buildings blend seamlessly with the old.

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All of this walking has made us hungry; at last we settle into a table on the patio at Dublin Village Tavern; it’s a perfect day to eat outdoors. The tavern building was built in 1889, it was originally a hardware store, then it was the Post Office, DVT opened in 2000; the original hand-cut oak studs and beams are still supporting the structure. There’s a picture of George Killian Lett–the grandson of the founder of Killians Brewery in Ireland from his visit to the tavern hanging in the brick room. Shortly after we place our order the Irish Egg Rolls arrive; corned beef, sauerkraut and swiss cheese served up with a side of 1000 Island dressing–they are so good….Next the Fresh Veggie Sandwich; cucumbers, radishes, tomato, alfalfa sprouts, red onion, avocado and arugula held between slices of 12-grain bread; crisp, cool and flavorful it hits the spot on a warm day.

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Dublin is also known for its Art In Public Places program, we’re going to check some of it out now. A short distance down High Street leads us to the place where an old blacksmith shop stood in the late 1800’s. Now there’s a structure made of thick green and yellow metal wires criss-crossing to form walls and a roof. It was designed to conjure up a memory of George M Karrer’s workshop. Field of Corn (With Osage Oranges) is next. 109 human-sized cement ears of corn stand on property that was once farmed by Sam Frantz. Walking around I notice a distinct row pattern as if I was actually looking at a corn field. The detail is pretty amazing, rows of niblets tucked tightly into the cob, some pieces are decorated with strips of material or random items. The sculpture symbolizes the history of the community’s farming legacy and is a memorial to the rural landscape.

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We drive over to Ballantrae Park, a master planned park and residential golf community. At the entrance to the subdivision we are greeted by Dancing Hares, a 15′ tall trio of dancing bunnies perched atop a 20′ tall hillock.  Dancing Hares was commissioned in 2001 by Edwards Golf Communities as the whimsical centerpiece for Ballantrae’s entry park. We climb the steep grassy hill to get a closer look, the artist has combined everyday items into the sculpture; I see coins, a light bulb, comb, wrench, miscellaneous hardware. It reminds me of those pictures in the Highlights magazine where you have to find the hidden objects. At the base of the hill is an interactive play fountain, in the afternoon heat it’s the place to be. It’s fun to watch the little ones marvel at the spouts of water shooting up from the ground–the parents look like they’re having a good time as well.

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Time to head to our hotel room. We have a little time to rest before heading to the Ohio Expo Center, tonight the Detroit Roller Derby All Stars are playing the Ohio Roller Girls, it should be a good match-up. I’ll let you know how it turns out…

DEARBORN: Glassy..

16 Apr

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We’re in Dearborn for the Glass Academy’s Eggstravaganza; I’ve always wanted to attend one of their events. The 14,000 sq. ft. facility is nestled in an area of vintage tool and die buildings on the west side of Dearborn. A large outdoor sign announces the gallery, there’s a cool Verner Panton design on one of the doors. The studio is open to the public Wednesday through Saturday functioning as a teaching facility, event space and design studio. Staff members create sculptures for private, corporate and public clients. Today the gallery will be filled with chicks, eggs, bunnies and nests.

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A short hallway leads us into a large, open, industrial-feeling space. People are milling about, they go from table to table, egg cartons in hand trying to make their selections. An orange glow emanates from the glass furnace, chairs are empty waiting for the demonstration to begin. Eggs are smooth or rippled, clear or frosted, colors are swirled, striped or mottled; I hold one in my hand and am surprised by the weight. They take up residence in cardboard crates, delicate glass cups and nests. Long-eared bunnies wear spring colors; pink, lime green and yellow. I’m fascinated by the glass nests; clear blue, crystal or pastel they remind me of spun sugar.

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Glassy chicks are today’s theme, they’re adorable! Blown in a rainbow of colors some are transparent, others are frosted, iridescent. Big and small they stand on metal legs; each is unique, as hard as I try, I cannot pick just one favorite. Off to the side a table displays nature-in-glass; percolla reeds, succulents, flowers and sporrela mushrooms–my favorite of the group. The Detroit table is next. Another area exhibits stunning pumpkins and gourds, how do they get the stems to twist and turn like that? Like what you see? You’ll have to come for the Glass Pumpkin Fest in October. A wall is fitted with pegs, dozens of  hanging mugs are for sale, want to make your own? Sign up for the Hot Glass + Cold Beer class. The next table over is filled with Christmas items; trees, snowmen, candy canes, reindeer and snowflakes.

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On my way to the glass blowing demonstration I stop and stare at dozens of hanging glass balls; gold, amber, clear and green spheres strung from the ceiling, cool! The chairs are now filled as spectators watch, listen and learn from master glassblowers. Kris and I stand and watch as a nest is created before our very eyes. It always makes me nervous when they break the glass off the metal pipe; this one is a beauty. Glass Academy offers a variety of seasonal classes, coffee night, custom mug night and events. It’s a pretty amazing place, check it out for yourself.

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Today we’re having lunch at the ever-popular Al-Ameer on W. Warren; it’s one of the go-to places for Middle Eastern/Mediterranean food in Dearborn. Walking through the parking lot we pass cars from 4 different states. Inside we’re seated in a comfy booth, given water and menus, the latter is unnecessary. Our waiter takes our order and within minutes (yes, minutes) we are digging into vegetarian grape leaves, falafel, tabbouli, tahini, hommos and a basket of their to-die-for, straight-from-the-oven bread. It’s delicious, all of it, enough said.

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No visit to Dearborn is complete without stopping at Shatila for something sweet. The sun streams in from surrounding windows and reflects off the marble floor, Palm trees as high as the ceiling sprout from the perimeter, their trunks wrapped in tiny white lights. Mediterranean and French pastries are the specialty here, I go one way, Kris the other, meeting in the middle. The line moves quickly on this Sunday afternoon, before we know it we’re enjoying bites of rich  chocolate tart and a pistachio torte. It almost feels like we’re sitting on a patio outdoors. We take our time, savoring the flavors, the surroundings and the day.

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DETROIT: Glass Art

21 Feb

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The Scarab Club opened it’s doors on Farnsworth in 1928 joining the year-old DIA building in Detroit’s newly formed Cultural Center. The beautiful Arts and Crafts structure was designed by architect and member Lancelot Sukert. Home to an artists club, gallery and studios, artists and art lovers meet here regularly to socialize and talk art. Back in the early 20th century Detroit gave birth to a new art form: automotive design and with it the evolution of automobile advertising art. Many of the original founding members of the Scarab Club were automotive designers, illustrators, graphic artists, photographers, architects and automobile company owners. It’s only fitting that American Dreaming: Corvette, 7 Generations and Beyond is on exhibit in the main gallery.

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The documentary, American Dreaming, about the Detroit artists who designed cars from 1946-1973 is in the process of being completed; the film covers Ford, GM, Chrysler, Packard, Studebaker, Nash and Hudson, this exhibit focuses solely on the Chevrolet Corvette. Introduced in 1953 the Corvette became the iconic American sports car. Here we see original drawings and models created by General Motors designers, the fact that these drawings still exist and are on display for all of us to see is incredible. In the design studios talented men and women put pencil to paper sketching cars straight from their imaginations. Studios were closely guarded, manufacturers considered the drawings company property, artists were not allowed to keep their work, instead most was destroyed. Once the artists figured out what was happening they found a way to sneak their drawings out, it was risky, you could lose your job if caught. They took their chances.

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Just look at the photographs of the framed sketches; side pipes, flames shooting out from dual exhaust pipes, bold colors, sleek designs all expressing the American optimism of the time. Concept cars were futuristic, they could fly through space, drive on elevated super-highways, they were race cars for the ordinary guy. Cars were beautiful, elegant, glamorous, exotic. One of my favorites is the gold Corvette with the #1 by Allen Young, the 1956 by Brock looks like a cousin of the Batmobile; drivers wear helmets, their faces carry the look of speed. We see the Corvette from all angles, some drawings focus on tail lights or the grill, monotone or color they’re all incredibly cool! The plain white paper has yellowed over the years but the designs look as fresh as if they were done yesterday. These rare, vintage drawings still capture our attention. Concept art is finally getting its due and being recognized as fine art.

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We’re grabbing a bite to eat at Bucharest Grill on Piquette Ave. This wildly popular restaurant began as a take-out counter inside The Park Bar. After a parting of ways Bucharest has branched out with 3 Detroit locations. The food is all handmade from original recipes, they serve Romanian dishes, Middle Eastern cuisine and hot dogs. Everything is fresh, fair-priced and delicious! Shawarma is a must, throw in a couple of hot dogs and we’re set.

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We take a seat at the window overlooking Piquette while we wait for our food to be prepared, it doesn’t take long. The chicken shawarma is the best I’ve ever eaten; grilled marinated chicken breast, tomato, lettuce, pickles and to-die-for garlic sauce all wrapped in a pita. The Hamtramck is a kielbasa dog topped with braised red cabbage, bacon and spicy mustard tucked into a sesame seed bun, so good. The Detroiter is knockwurst drenched in coney sauce, grilled onions and cheddar cheese on a sesame seed bun, yum! This place is always packed but they get you in and out quickly. Amazing art and tasty food; not a bad way to spend the day.