Tag Archives: Historic Neighborhoods

Columbus Ohio: Wandering…

6 May

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We’ve dipped south about 3 hours into Columbus Ohio; after spending the night in German Village we take a drive around the area before heading downtown. On Kossuth, a quiet neighborhood street, we pass an unassuming cement block building, a Packard Service sign hangs above the open door, a 1957 Nash Ambassador Custom peeks out onto the street, vintage signs dangle from the ceiling. What is this place? We park at the corner and wander into the building, we are greeted by a gentlemen asking us if we’re his appointment–no, do we need one? He smiles and invites us into the garage, he explains he is expecting a local couple to come have a look around and encourages us to do the same–thank you! The building was built in 1930 for 80 years it was an automotive repair and paint shop, today it holds the personal collection of these two business partners. They own about 40 cars between them, then there’s the soap box derby cars hanging on the wall, signs from gas and oil companies, antique gas pumps, banners, flags, Dodge, Buick, Plymouth and Packard memorabilia, and the largest collection of license plates I’ve ever laid my eyes on.

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Cars are parked single file against the right wall, at an angle on the left. The Nash is the first vehicle to greet us, look at that rear vent window. The red 1958 Edsel is gorgeous, see those buttons in the center of the steering wheel? P for park, R, reverse, N, neutral, Hi and Lo, believe it or not, that’s how you shift!  The 1956 Cadillac has the gas cap hidden under the tail light, the 56 Imperial is elegant, there’s another Edsel over there–powder blue, cool door-mounted mirror, look at that E mounted on the front fender, sweet. Lots of chrome, huge bumpers, designs resemble aircraft, torpedoes, rockets. The back section holds older vehicles; a bunch of Packards, an Auburn. There’s so much to look at; display cabinets are filled with hood ornaments, advertising and trinkets. Goodyear, Shell, Mobil, neon signs, city plaques for licence plates, how cool. It was sheer luck we happened by when the door was open, the owner was extremely generous with his time and stories. If you’d like to check out the Wagner-Hagans Auto Museum for yourself, call 614-271-0888 and make an appointment to stop by.

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Before you read any further, do me a favor, click on this link: “A Sunday Afternoon on the Isle of La Grande Jatte”. Done? Good. We’re in the Town-Franklin neighborhood on East Town Street at a free, public, Topiary Park, we are looking at the topiary interpretation of George Seurat’s said painting, in other words, it’s a landscape of a painting of a landscape–it’s the only known topiary of a painting. The garden was started in 1988, local sculptor James T Mason designed and built the bronze frames and planted the shrubs. His wife, Elaine, was the original topiarist, she trained the city gardeners how to trim the topiaries. The pond was added in 1989 representing the Seine in Paris, hills were also added to the landscape. The gatehouse came along in 1998 and is home to the Visitors Center.

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I have seen reproductions of A Sunday Afternoon multiple times, here the Parisians enjoying a leisurely afternoon are made of Yew but you totally get the picture. Throughout the park there are 54 human figures, 8 boats, 3 dogs, a monkey and a cat. We walk along taking it all in; flower beds are freshly weeded and mulched, daffodils are in bloom, shrubs are just starting to fill in. I recognize the woman with the parasol and large bustle who resides in the forefront of the painting. Characters gaze out across the grounds, a man in a boat is fishing. They sit, they stand, in solitaire, arm and arm or groups; books, top hats, more parasols, it all comes together when you know what you’re looking at. The painting itself hangs in the Art Institute of Chicago. We exit the garden wandering past Cristo Rey High School; decorative brick patterns and stonework surrounding the windows are magnificent, then  onto East Town Street to check out the spectacular homes.

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Now we’re on the near east side of Columbus in the Olde Towne East neighborhood; stately homes line the streets, flowering trees are in bloom, let’s take a walk. This is one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods; farmhouses once occupied the land, by the 1870’s it transitioned into a subdivision of grand houses built by industrialists, judges, businessmen, lawyers, mayors, governors, you know, the rich and famous of Columbus OH. Back in the day locals nicknamed it the ‘Silk Stocking District’ referring to the residents expensive clothing. By the 1950’s much of the housing was abandoned by the wealthy, palatial homes were divided into apartments, nursing homes or rooming houses; the final blow came with the construction of the highways. Same story, different city. Thanks to the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the Neighborhood Association was able to begin preservation efforts of Olde Towne East in the 1970’s.

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Today the area is once again on the rise; gentrification has begun, new businesses are opening, Main Street is a mix of public and private development. They say there are over 50 architectural styles spread out over 1,000 homes. We walk past gorgeous 2 and 3-story homes that have been restored or are in the process of restoration; wrought iron fences, columns, turrets, ornate moldings and trim grace lavish residences. Edwardian, Victorian, Second Empire, Romanesque, Italianate, well, you get the idea. Most are brick some have leaded glass windows, beautiful stonework surrounds windows and doorways. Streetscapes are lovely; lawns are neatly kept, ornamental shrubs and trees fill the landscape, today Tulips are in bloom. Olde Towne East was the subject of a documentary film, Flag Wars, back in 2003; after many hardships it’s wonderful to see the neighborhood return to its former glory.

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Cincinnati: See Ya’ Later !

3 Feb

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It’s our last day in Cincinnati, we’re in the Camp Washington neighborhood to check out the American Sign Museum. Tod Swormstedt, former editor and publisher of Signs of the Times magazine has taken his passion for signs and opened a museum in a former parachute factory with 19,000 sq. ft. of exhibit space. Historic signs, books, photos and documents reflecting the art, craft and history of sign-making hang from the ceiling, rest on the floor, fill walls, shelves and display cases. From the days of pictures drawn on cave entrances to colorful signs hanging from shops to the gas-lit illuminated signs of the late 1800’s on to the electrical signs of the early 1900’s, neon and finally plastics, signs have always been a part of the landscape. Signs tell us our location and how to get somewhere, the nature of a building, what brand we should buy, where we should eat, shop, play, stay. The museum highlights the sign industry from the days of goldleaf glass signs through the heyday of neon to the plastic era of the 1950’s.

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Driving down Monmouth vintage signs catch our eye; this must be the place. Parking in the lot, signs surround us, the familiar Holiday Inn with its signature green lettering, a giant hammer from a hardware store, a 20′ bowling pin. At first glance it appears a man on a ladder is in the process of painting the exterior brick wall, a closer look reveals it’s a mural depicting the old-fashioned process of painting signs on the side of a building–this one is amazing! The neon El Rancho motel sign is great, with all of this in the parking lot, I can hardly wait to see what’s inside. Crossing the threshold under the gigantic genie, inside we pay our admission then walk as directed toward the giant yellow arrow with its flashing light bulbs. A rainbow of neon welcomes us to the first gallery; a 50’s style sputnik with light bulb letters twirls, large-scale neon signs, illuminated plastic signs and art deco-style pieces compete for our attention. Neon signs in original crates, pop-culture classics such as Gulf, Shell, Greyhound and Col. Sanders fill the room. Ice cream cones, a swinging golfer on a golf ball, and a motel signs are fantastic to look at.

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Main Street is lined with pavers, shops on both sides of the street are home to every variety of sign from hand-painted to an authentic Mc Donalds sign featuring Mr. Speedee; the original blueprint sits nearby. Taverns, motels, banks, bars and restaurants are all represented. Shop windows hold displays of the art of sign-painting; brushes, paint and alphabet samples even books teaching the skill. There are glass doors with hand-painted letters and numbers reminding me of the Fisher Building in Detroit, make your own sign kits with decals, neon art deco clocks, enameled metal signs for Goodyear. Hand-lettered showcards from Las Vegas featuring Frank Sinatra and Charo remind us that signs serve many purposes from commerce to culture. We walk up and down Main Street reveling in the colors, kitsch and memories. Cars outlined in neon circle a globe, Howard Johnson’s offers us ice cream in 28 flavors, the Acapulco sign with dual palm trees is fabulous!

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Huge signs take up space in the back section; the side of a barn is mounted on the wall, Chew Mail Pouch Tobacco is the message painted in block letters. SEE BEAUTIFUL ROCK CITY atop LOOKOUT MT reads another. Our favorite is the Habig’s sign with the tipping champagne glass, stand close and you can hear the mechanics of the light bulbs flashing off and on, so cool! A working neon shop, Neonworks has their own section where they create and repair neon signs, sometimes you can even watch them work. We finish up our visit, stopping to read placards along the way, the histories and timelines are fascinating. The museum is absolutely delightful, so glad we came.

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We’re having lunch on Hamilton Ave in the Northside neighborhood, Melt Eclectic Cafe offers healthy gourmet sandwiches, fresh salads and soups. We order at the counter then sit in the front window section to wait for our food. Our East Village wrap arrives; rosemary goat cheese, pesto, roasted red peppers, smoked turkey and arugula wrapped up tight and a side of curried potato salad–both are delicious. After lunch we stroll down the street, except for one new development Northside looks much the same as it always has; local entrepreneurs fill street level shops in beautiful historic buildings, a lovely selection of housing stock is available. I love the mural with daisies covering a powder blue background. We stop in at Bee Haven which sells a variety of products including honey, beeswax candles and chocolate, we try a few samples, I grab some lip balm and we’re off. Taking our time we wander in and out of Happy Chicks Bakery, a Cluxton Alley coffee shop called Collective Espresso, Shake It Records selling new and used vinyl, CD’s and DVD’s, a vintage shop called Chicken Lays An Egg with racks and racks of funky clothing, shoes and accessories. The neighborhood is home to a diverse population; college students, the creative class, young professionals and GLBTQ all live in the historic district. 

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We grab a coffee at Sidewinder, hop in the Jeep and start our journey north. It has been a great few days in Cincinnati but it’s time to head home. Kris is taking the scenic route; in West Liberty OH he veers off on State Route 245, it is here you will find the largest of all the cave systems in Ohio at the Ohio Caverns. The caverns were discovered in August 1897 by farm hand Robert Noffsinger, when he informed the landowner of his discovery, William Reams explored the caverns for himself then opened the cave to the public in September 1897. After 25 years of people removing crystals, touching formations and writing their names on walls and ceilings with smoke from oil lamps, the area was destroyed. In 1922 two brothers bought the land and spent 3 1/2 years digging out mud left in the tunnels by the underground river that formed the cavern, they dug out a 1-mile route, strung light bulbs powered by a Fordson tractor on the surface and opened the business as the Ohio Caverns in 1925. Concrete floors were put in in the 1970’s and a lighting professional came in the 1980’s creating concrete sconces and less obstructive lighting. The tour still uses the 1925 route.

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We purchase tickets in the gift shop, a tour is just about to start, good timing… We descend the concrete stairway to the cave entrance, though the pathway is narrow it does not feel constricting, water drips from the cave ceiling, it has been raining for days, shallow puddles form on the walkway. Our tour guide is friendly and informative, she shines the beam of her flashlight on significant formations as we go. Artificial light from nearby bulbs has caused moss to grow in a few areas, care is now taken to turn off lights as the group progresses through the cave. The pathway is smooth, the ceiling low, formations are everywhere. Stalactites cling to the ceiling, stalagmites sprout from the floor, soda straws hang from above. Walls vary in patterns, textures and colors. The Crystal Sea is a water retention pool that holds excess water out of the walkway, the ceiling reflects on the surface of the pool, a bevy of crystals clustered together, so pretty. The Natural Bridge holds nearly 20 crystal columns and is the original floor of the tunnel, they left the columns intact when they dug the pathway, digging under the columns, forming the natural bridge.

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One section holds more soda straws and helictites than any other area of the cavern, they call it Fantasy Land, yep, I can see that. Our guide shines her light on a formation and asks the group what it looks like, this is Old Town Pump, it really does look like a hand pump. The formations remind me of icicles, carrots, coral. Crystal King is estimated to be over 200,000 years old and was last measured at almost 5′ long. There’s a tranquility in the cave that’s hard to describe, maybe it’s being so far underground. We stop to look at the ‘good luck’ crystal, the top now stained brown from years of being touched by visitors, a no-touch rule has now been established. We enter the Palace of the Gods, rich in color it feels lavish compared to the other areas. The variety of colors on the walls come from iron oxide and manganese dioxide, lavish surfaces of flowstone, calcite formations, columns and dual formations make this section unique. The Jewel Room is the most colorful, the color splits down the middle of the room making one side a rusty iron oxide color, the other a darker color from manganese dioxide deposits. This is the end of the tour. A recording of Beautiful Ohio starts to play, a time-honored tradition since 1928. 

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This is the end of our tour too. We hope you have enjoyed tagging along with us on our southern Ohio adventure. See you back in Detroit!

YPSILANTI: Neighborhood Treasures

9 Jul

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Ypsilanti is about 35 miles west and a little south of Detroit, most folks know it as the home of Eastern Michigan University. In 1835 the road from Detroit to Chicago (now called Michigan Ave) opened, train service arrived in 1838, allowing travelers easy access to the city. Michigan Normal College, a school for training teachers, was founded in 1849, today we know it as EMU. Flour mills, saw mills and plaster mills along with farming brought wealth to early residents; the city is dense with beautiful, historic architecture. Ypsi is home to the second largest historic district in Michigan. Today we are getting an up-close look at some of the city’s finest homes on the 38th Annual Historic Home Tour. It seems many historic districts share the same story, just as a city landmark is about to be demolished, residents ban together, form a foundation, create a historic district and save the structure; such is the case with the Ypsilanti Heritage Foundation

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The structure I am referring to is known as  The Towner House, it’s where we begin our tour. At one time the First Presbyterian Church of Ypsilanti owned the house and property, wanting to expand the church’s footprint they planned to demolish Towner House, that’s when a group of people stepped up, joined together, formed the Heritage Foundation and saved the house from demolition; today the Towner House Foundation owns the house. Built in 1837 in the Greek Revival style, the renovated exterior is a lovely medium blue. The building stands on its original stone foundation, the original timbers used in construction still bear their bark, we’ve never seen that before, it’s pretty amazing. The interior is gutted; walls are missing plaster, ceilings are open, remnants of wallpaper found on walls rest on a table. Wood floors, a pretty marble fireplace and a portrait remind us of the families who once lived here. Collecting stories from people who once lived in the home or neighborhood is ongoing as the restoration process continues— at 178 years old, that’s a lot of stories

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Just down North Huron Street we find ourselves in front of a gorgeous Tudor Revival home built in 1921, because of its size the front entrance and facade face the south side of the lot. Members of Ypsi’s most prominent families once called the place home. Trees and shrubs create a tranquil landscape, bright red Geraniums fill flower pots, whimsical sculptures are tucked into plantings. Dark wood beams frame stucco, this house uses the pebble-dash method, the amount of exterior detail is staggering. The living room is a sunny yellow lit up by the afternoon sun, built-in leaded glass bookcases line the back wall, original chandeliers and sconces still adorn the home.

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  Across the street a spacious red-brick home is a pleasant blend of Italianate, Georgian and Colonial Revival styles. Built in 1860 for a local haberdasher, ensuing residents were also wealthy; the best known being Danile Quirk Jr, son of the founder of Peninsular Paper Company and the National Bank of Ypsilanti. During the time Ypsi owned the house, the 14th Circuit Court operated out of the library Quirk added in 1927.  The house now contains the offices of Manchester & Associates. As we pass through the reception area we notice many of the original details remain such as splendid fireplaces and exquisite plasterwork.The library is stunning; handsome wood covers the walls and ceiling, built-in bookshelves are crammed tight with volumes, a petite arch leads to a tunnel-like stairway to the balcony, we have a great overall view of the library from here. When we exit we study a large black and white photo that captures the elaborate terraced gardens that once covered the back slope of this hill.

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The next stop on the tour is a former carriage house turned apartment, it sits behind a grand home that is now the Ypsilanti Historical Museum. When the horse and carriage was phased out the automobile took its place in the building; it was turned into apartments around 1930. We climb the long stairway to the second floor, the space is modern and attractive with a wonderful view. We pop into the museum for a look around; all the goodies you’d expect to see in a well-to-do 1860’s home are here: plaster ceiling medallions, winding staircase, fancy chandeliers, ornate plaster moldings and beautiful furnishings. The historical society displays the history of Ypsi in rooms at the back of the house; display cases exhibit old photos, war relics, the stories of Tucker and Elija McCoy, all very interesting.

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We leave the neighborhood taking Washtenaw to the next tour home, a gorgeous brick Tudor built in 1932. I love the exterior brick, an assortment of colors with dark clinker bricks sticking out. The details are extensive inside and out; stonework, leaded glass panels, plaster and fabulous ceramic tile—it still has the original sconces too! The owner is a collector of fine things, the home reflects his good taste.

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Just up the road on Huron River Drive we find ourselves at a farmhouse built in 1841 by the Starkweather family. Built in the Greek Revival style the home is in the process of being renovated into apartments. The current owner has been able to restore some of the original features in the process. The last tour home is a Mid Century ranch built in 1956. The builder lived in a beautiful Gothic-style home, he split the property, built this house and moved in with his family. The exterior appears much as it did then, the interior has been extensively updated. One of the cool things about an old neighborhood is the variety of homes that sit side by side.

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We are having lunch in Depot Town at Maiz Mexican Cantina on E Cross Street. Specializing in Tex-Mex, the food is prepared from scratch daily. Patio tables extend across the sidewalk, chairs are a mix of red, green and white, the colors of Mexico’s flag; it’s a perfect day to sit outside. With a little help from our server we place our order, we gobble up colorful tortilla chips dipping them in spicy salsa and creamy guacamole. Our tacos arrive; flour tortillas stuffed to capacity with tasty fillings like pan-fried avocado slices dusted in cornmeal, flour and sesame seeds, beer-battered cod and vegetable hash. Toppings include spicy slaw, chipotle cream, mango salsa and cilantro aioli, everything is delicious! Side dishes of black beans and corn on the cob are equally tasty. We linger on the patio sipping cold beverages; a steady stream of folks come and go, pedestrians carry ice cream cones and shopping bags. What a perfect summer day. 

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DETROIT: West Village

28 Oct

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It’s a gorgeous Autumn day; the kind that lures you outdoors with brilliant colors, mild temperatures, piles of fallen leaves. This late in October we are reminded that days like this are limited, there is a sense of urgency to get out and enjoy every last one. It’s hard to find a prettier, more charming neighborhood than West Village at this time of year; beautiful historic homes, mature trees, shops and cafes, all quite walkable. Bordered by Jefferson and Kercheval, Parker and Seyburn, the neighborhood is a perfect mix of single family homes, luxury apartments and small businesses. Let’s go for a walk.

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Near the corner of Kercheval and Parker stands Parker Street Market; opened since April, it was an immediately hit with the community. It’s a step back in time to when every neighborhood had a corner store; a place where you could grab milk, bread, lettuce, chips, baked goods and a cup of coffee. Today’s version carries organic produce, raw juice, Michigan made products and local honey. The cute little storefront is flanked by potted mums, large front windows afford us a view of the tasty treats that await us inside. The interior is a work in progress, as more items are added there is cause to change and rearrange. The tin ceiling is ornate, the floor, dark wood, shelves and coolers line the walls. Sister Pie has been busy stocking shelves with Salted Maple Pie, Buckwheat Chocolate Chip Cookies and a tray of shortbread. Bottles of Drought  juice fill a small refrigerator, ready-made salads, wraps, Calder milk, local pickles and produce stuff a cooler. Dry beans, French baguette, chocolate bars, Dave’s Sweet Tooth Toffee, tea, salsa, jam and bags of coffee from Populace tempt shoppers. French lava cakes, ice cream sandwiches and veggie burgers await purchase in a small freezer, if you’re hungry you’re sure to find a fix here. We purchase our shortbread cookies and we’re off.

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After much anticipation The Red Hook coffee shop opened on Agnes Street earlier this month. Serving Stumptown Coffee, fresh-baked goods from Pinwheel Bakery and Zingerman’s, neighbors wonder how they ever got along without the cafe. Gold letters spell out The Red Hook on the front window, inside, coffee perfumes the air, pastries are arranged on brown paper that covers the counter. The space is bright; walls are off-white, light-colored wood makes up the built-in seating, sunlight drenches the space. I order a dark roast, Kris chooses cold brew, service is super friendly, the coffee is really good; cups in hand we’re out the door. Steps away, the door to Tarot & Tea stands open, we wander inside. The shop has a peaceful, elegant feel to it; silky cloths cover tables, a couple of chandeliers light the room, a frilly framed mirror hangs on the wall; near the back is a reading room behind heavy drapes. The shop offers goods and services; you can relax with a cup of organic tea, have a tarot card or spiritual reading, pick up a unique gift. We browse through the store looking at lovely items such as vintage jewelry and clothing, tea, herbs, crystals, candles, oils and body products. A steady stream of pedestrians wander in and out; open less than a month, people are just discovering the boutique.

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We stroll down Parker towards Jefferson, I love this time of year, the dark green grass a marked contrast to colorful leaves. Well-kept houses are big and bigger, each a different architectural style. Kris likes the variety of porches, some with room for two chairs, others mimic the piazza’s found in old southern homes. Mature trees surround Queen Anne’s, Tudor’s, Mediterranean and Georgian Revival’s; pumpkins dot porches and landscapes. Entrances make a statement; leaded glass, lanterns, arches and carved wood are stunning. West Village is just west of Indian Village (hence the name…) I remember being told many of these homes were built for the children of the wealthy families that resided in Indian Village. Most houses are three stories, brick and stone are the materials of choice, multiple chimneys shoot up from rooftops, columns are popular too. Speaking of columns, The Colonial is a massive gray brick apartment building that looms on the corner of Parker and Lafayette; towering columns stretch from the first story to the third, massive balconies hang from the upper floors, rounded steps lead to the front doors. The building is a least a half-block long, it is divided into 6 units, each about 2,000 square feet. We are lucky enough to have been inside, let me tell you, it’s splendid!

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Making our way to Seyburn we pass tall brick apartment buildings, built at a time when money wasn’t an issue, design details like carved stone, tiles, balconies and lots of unique shaped windows are common. We have been in several of the apartments for open houses, they’re huge, complete with multiple fireplaces, richly detailed plaster, best of all they’re quiet.  A corner house constructed of large stones on the bottom and wood shingles on the top still has a covered entrance from where the carriage would stop and let the family into the house; cars were not common when many of these beauties were constructed. A fancy yellow Dutch Colonial catches our eye, originally (1896), this was the home of Julius Melcher, a notable Detroit sculptor. The centerpiece is, of course, the ornately carved gable, which Melcher did himself. Nearby, another house uses large stones, the huge porch  accessible through wide arches, it reminds me of a lodge. Of course there are the turrets, what is it about a home with turrets that I find so appealing? We walk and walk, stopping here and there to study a particular structure, churches, doorways, capitols, tile roofs, sculptures and facades.

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There is an energy of renewal going on in West Village, the newest example being Paramita Sound on Van Dyke, a brand new record shop that opened over the weekend. Stationed inside an old house Paramita offers new, used and re-issued vinyl records—yes, I said records! We had a chance to talk with the founder Andrey Douthard, he told us besides records, the shop has a listening lounge for in-store performances, the shop will offer beer, listening stations and a chance to listen before you buy, cool! As we head back over to Agnes, we pass the West Village Bark Park, a dog and his owner bask in the afternoon sun. The Parkstone has been a West Village landmark for decades, we pop in to have a look. The lobby remains old school, a round table rests below a chandelier in the center of the space, to the right is the desk, rows of wooden cubbies hold residents daily mail. To the left is a lounge area, through delicate iron gates wide planks make up the floor, plaster molding surrounds the ceiling, a piano sits quietly, a massive fireplace fills the far wall, chairs and couches make up several seating arrangements, just like the old days. 

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At last 4:00 has arrived, that’s when Craft Work, a new restaurant and bar on the first floor of the Parkstone, starts serving for the day. If you are a long-time Detroiter, you may remember the space from when it was the Harlequin Cafe, and for a very short time Coffee and (____) popped up in the space. We are delighted when we get inside and see little has changed; the beautiful woodwork looks freshly polished, built-in shelves hold volumes of books, photos, mementos. The terazzo floor remains, simple globe lights illuminate the room. Stools line long communal tables, this is the bar area, the dining room opens later, we are here for the Happy Hour. For now we are the only patrons, our server is cheerful and knowledgeable about the menu. We place our order, the server returns quickly with Kris’s cocktail, a Lemon Drop, I am tempted by the sugared rim.

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As we wait for our meal, folks start to trickle in, it’s Friday and everybody is anxious to kick off the weekend. First out is the Crab Dip, a delicious combination of spinach, artichokes, crab, mascarpone and spices; the pile of sliced baguette disappears rapidly. The cheeseburger arrives wrapped partially in white paper accompanied by thinly cut fries, the menu listed ‘cheeseburger’ so we’re not sure how it’s dressed. We each grab a half, take a big bite and enjoy the burger. I couldn’t tell you what kind of sauce or seasoning they use, just that it’s scrumptious, as are the shoestring fries, a friend has joined us, she’s savoring a fish taco. Taking our time, we finish our food and drinks, happy to be back in such a handsome, quaint place. What a perfect way to end the afternoon!